Missouri House Speaker Richardson will run state Medicaid insurance program

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson will leave the Statehouse to oversee management of the state’s low-income health-insurance program. Gov. Mike Parson on Monday appointed Richardson, 41, director of MO HealthNet. The appointment will take effect Nov. 1, about two months before Richardson's term in the House was to end.

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Here's How Russia Runs Its Disinformation Effort Against The 2018 Midterms

The Justice Department has revealed more than ever about the inner workings of Russia's disinformation war against the United States and the West – including how it continues to this day. A criminal complaint unsealed Friday in the Eastern District of Virginia served both to level charges at a woman accused of serving as the money boss for the operation but also to document, in ample detail, how it works. Who's responsible? The branch of active measures the Russians call "Project Lakhta" has...

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Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi was "brutally murdered" as part of a meticulous plan, Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said Tuesday. Erdogan called for Saudi Arabia to share facts about the case; he also suggested the suspects should be tried in Turkey.

Missouri House Speaker Todd Richardson will leave the Statehouse to oversee management of the state’s low-income health-insurance program.

Gov. Mike Parson on Monday appointed Richardson, 41, director of MO HealthNet. The appointment will take effect Nov. 1, about two months before Richardson's term in the House was to end.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The Museum of the Bible said on Monday that five of its 16 famous Dead Sea Scrolls fragments are fakes.

A team of German experts analyzed the privately funded Washington, D.C., museum's fragments and found they had "characteristics inconsistent with ancient origin." The fragments will no longer be displayed at the museum.

Copyright 2018 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Another Storm Victim — Pecan Groves In Southwest Georgia

3 hours ago

Tucked away in a corner of the Pine Knoll Pecan Grove, near the town of Pretoria, Ga., is one of those things that Mitch Bulger says made the decades he spent living and working here worth it — a bubbling spring-fed pool.

"I promise you," he told me. "Stick your finger in that. It's the coldest water."

Over the past couple of decades, booming cities have forced people to move to smaller cities nearby. Think San Francisco and Oakland, Calif., or New York and Hoboken, N.J. That kind of boom is happening now in Boston. An hour away, New England's second-largest city, Worcester, is booming.

"Properties are hot commercially, properties are hot residentially ... everyone just wants a piece of Worcester right now. It's crazy," said Kate McEvoy, a vice president for Harvard Pilgrim Health Care and fifth-generation Worcesterite.

It's a chilly autumn afternoon but inside a little Brooklyn bakery, it's hot. School just let out, and the store is filled with kids eyeing baked goodies. Their banter mixes with Caribbean music playing in the background.

La Gran Via Bakery is an institution in this neighborhood. It's been around since 1978 — three generations of pastry chefs making cakes, cupcakes and traditional Latin American pastries.

More than 300 people recently packed into a college auditorium in the middle of a weekday to see Tallahassee Mayor Andrew Gillum in St. Petersburg, Fla. The Democrat is running for governor and, if elected, would be the first in the party to win the seat in the state in 20 years. He'd also be the first African-American governor in the Florida's history.

He's facing former Republican U.S. Rep. Ron DeSantis in a contest that has been marked by heated attacks, the influence of President Trump and a hurricane.

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