Making a Difference

Every Other Month

Supported by the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, Making a Difference is a long-running series that draws upon the personal stories and voices of Ozarks residents to highlight key issues impacting our community. 

Past seasons have included stories on poverty relief, public education, mental illness and other topics important to our community. You can browse our Making a Difference archives below or at the CFO website.

Making a Difference 2020-2021: Connecting through Conversation

No one would disagree that these are tumultuous times for our country and our community. Current political and philosophical divisions have left many feeling unheard, disenfranchised and isolated. But we’re not alone, and now, perhaps more than ever, we need to find common ground and connect around the one thing we all share – our humanity. With this in mind, the theme of KSMU’s 2020-2021 Making a Difference series is “Connecting Through Conversation.”

Making a Difference: Connecting Through Conversation – a collaboration between the Community Foundation of the Ozarks and KSMU Public Radio – will feature a series of conversations between people in respectful relationships with opposing views. Why? Because we suspect conversations create a pathway to connection and may uncover more commonality than division. As a public media station, we know everyone has a story to tell and by sharing these stories, we all can contribute to an engaging and diverse cultural fabric where everyone's story matters.

Is there someone in your life that you feel doesn’t understand or empathize with your views or beliefs? Someone you admire or respect though you differ politically, racially, or philosophically? Have you felt that you are viewed as being less important to our community or society in general because you or your views are different from others? We'd like to hear from you.

KSMU Radio is looking for pairs of friends or family members who are willing to record themselves discussing an issue, view, or belief on which you disagree. We're interested in discovering how these conversations create a connection between people and offer a starting point for reconciliation.

Those interested in contributing to the Making a Difference: Connecting Through Conversation series can submit for consideration HERE

Ozarks Public Broadcasting/Community Foundation Of The Ozarks

From Ozarks Public Radio at KSMU.org, this is Making a Difference; Connecting Through Conversation, an ongoing series produced in cooperation with the Community Foundation of the Ozarks.

The 2020-2021 season of Making a Difference Connecting Through Conversation, features a series of conversations between persons in respectful relationships, but with opposing views. Today, we hear from a father and son from Springfield Missouri, with different opinions on third party voters.

gemsociety.org

Next on KSMU, your public radio station, another Conversation On Collaboration from our ongoing series Making a Difference, supported by the Community Foundation of the Ozarks.

Community Foundation Of The Ozarks

As part of our ongoing series Making a Difference, produced in cooperation with the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, we present another Conversation on Collaboration.  Today, we look at collaborative solutions put forth by the CFO, The United Way of the Ozarks, and the Community Partnership of the Ozarks, to support local and regional COVID-19 coronavirus relief efforts.

Brian Fogle is president of the Community Foundation Of The Ozarks.

Comunity Foundation Of The Ozarks

Next on KSMU, as part of our ongoing series Making A Difference, produced in cooperation with the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, we present another Conversation on Collaboration. And today, the importance of working well with others when it comes to Placemaking, which Wikipedia defines as a multi-faceted approach to the planning, design and management of public spaces, capitalizing on a local community's, assets, inspiration and potential, with the intention of promoting people’s health, happiness and well-being... Placemaking.

Comunity Foundation Of The Ozarks

In 2018, the Community Foundation of the Ozarks teamed up with the Missouri Foundation for Health to provide funding for the Rural Ozarks Health Initiative, or ROHI.(pronounced Roh-Hee) It's a three year, $750,000 grant program to address priority health issues, and communities or regions served by C.F.O. Rural affiliate foundations.

Comunity Foundation Of The Ozarks

Last month in Springfield, representatives of philanthropic, charitable, technological and governmental groups from around the country and here at home, gathered to share stories and ideas of how collaborative philanthropy has and can, transform communities.

“I would say collaboration means, bringing people together to achieve forward thinking, common good, and measureable outcomes,” says Jenna Manders, from The Community Foundation of Greater Dubuque.

Comunity Foundation Of The Ozarks

Since the first Community Focus Report For Springfield/Greene County in 2004 and every edition since, Blue Ribbons have been awarded to the community for Continued Collaboration, and on this edition of KSMU’s Making a Difference, two former city officials and the head of the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, share  memories and insights of Springfield Missouri as a collaborative community. 

“If people have seen the movie Thelma and Louise, and at the end of the movie, they drive their car right off the cliff.  That’s what it’s like for me at times”, says Carolyn Crawford.  “When I know I’m going into a manic state, I have to stop and say ‘Wait a Minute’, and pull back from the cliff.  That’s how it affects me.  But I really didn’t know what it was”, Crawford said.   

Liz Delany/KGBX

“I hear the comments,” said KGBX Morning Host Liz Delany. “You know, 'She’s a little crazy.  Oop, don’t make her mad, she’s on medication.' Or, 'Sometimes she’s a little imbalanced, she might be having one of those days.'   I guess if I was a 'normal' person, if you will, I might say something like that,” Delany said.  

Exceptional Warriors

“PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury, that’s basically the wound of Iraq and Afghanistan.  The signature wound, if you will, is the TBI," said Anthony Norris, a graduate of Nixa High School.

On this edition of "Let’s Talk About It! Normalizing Mental Health Conversations," from the ongoing KSMU series Making a Difference, we hear about the mental health journey Norris finds himself on.

In 2006 during his senior year at Drury University, Norris chose to delay graduation and pharmacy school, to join the U.S. Army. 

Randy Bacon Photography Submitted By Tim and Mary Jane Holmes

You're listening to KSMU, and this is Making a Difference.

The Springfield Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavioral Health, Cox Health, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center. 

recoveryinmotion.com

On this edition of Making a Difference; Normalizing Mental Health Conversations, we meet Kendall Swanson, a Springfield Glendale High School graduate, who at 16, was prescribed opiates after a trip to the dentist.  By age 18, she was addicted to the drugs.

Aaron Scott / Community Foundation of the Ozarks

You're listening to KSMU, and this is Making a Difference.

The Springfield Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavorial Health, Cox Health, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center. 

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

Ginger Ramirez was going through tough times, a few years ago. The 33 year old and her children live in Northwest Springfield, Zone 1, which has the city’s highest rate of poverty: “Oh absolutely, there was no hope.  I felt like I was deteriorating, that I was falling apart, and my whole world was crashing. I wasn’t able to work anymore because of child care expenses.  I was living off donating plasma every week, making $70.00 a week.  That was my income to raise children and make a living.”

Community Foundation of the Ozarks

"In a rural community, the hospital takes on a bigger role, than it does, I think, in larger cities. The hospital is kind of all encompassing, and is there to provide whatever help you need."

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