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Covering state lawmakers, bills, and policy emerging from Jefferson City.

Nixon Vetoes Bill To Cap Lifetime Limit On Welfare Benefits At 45 Months

Operation Breakthrough's Sister Berta Sailer, center, introduces Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. Nixon has vetoed a plan to cut off TANF benefits after 45 months.
Operation Breakthrough's Sister Berta Sailer, center, introduces Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon. Nixon has vetoed a plan to cut off TANF benefits after 45 months.

Missouri Gov. Jay Nixon had harsh words for lawmakers who want to enact lifetime limits on the state's Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program.

Speaking at Operation Breakthrough in Kansas City, Missouri, Thursday morning, Nixon called Senate Bill 24 "a misguided measure that punishes poor children in the legislature's zeal to reduce reliance on government assistance."

Lawmakers want to cap TANF benefits at 45 months. Currently, families are eligible for five years of benefits.

Nixon says he vetoed the bill because it didn't account for the more than 6,400 children who will lose their eligibility on Jan. 1, 2016, if  the restrictions become law. 

"Now when it comes to adults, we can all agree on the need for personal responsibility. But these are kids. What can a 5-year-old do about that?" 

Nixon says if lawmakers want to cut benefits for adults who don't meet work requirements, that's one thing. But he says it's possible to divert TANF funds to an appointed guardian rather than cut children from the program entirely. The state already does that if a parent has a drug problem.

Sister Berta Sailer of Operation Breakthrough, a child care center for low-income families, thanked the governor for making the trip.

"We've been able to count on him to try and stop bad laws that are meant to hurt families," said Sailer of Nixon.

The Missouri House passed Senate Bill 24 111-36, and the Missouri Senate passed it 25-9. That's enough votes to override Nixon's veto in both chambers.

Copyright 2015 KCUR 89.3

Elle covers education for KCUR. The best part of her job is talking to students. Before coming to KCUR in 2014, Elle covered Indiana education policy for NPR’s StateImpact project. Her work covering Indiana’s exit from the Common Core was nationally recognized with an Edward R. Murrow award. Her work at KCUR has been recognized by the Missouri Broadcasters Association and the Kansas City Press Club. She is a graduate of the University Of Missouri School Of Journalism. Elle regularly tweets photos of her dog, Kingsley. There is a wounded Dr. Ian Malcolm bobblehead on her desk.