Johnny Kauffman

Johnny joined WABE in March, 2015. Before joining the station, he was a producer at Georgia Public Broadcasting, and NPR in Washington D.C.

At NPR, Johnny worked as a producer for "Morning Edition," "Weekend Edition," and "Tell Me More."

Johnny got his start in radio as host and station manager at WECI in Richmond, Indiana, where he went to Earlham College and graduated with a degree in English.

Johnny is a native of Goshen, Indiana, a small town in the northern part of the state.

It is likely to be a banner year for the voting equipment industry with state and local election offices planning to spend hundreds of millions of dollars on new machines ahead of the 2020 election.

This year's purchases will probably amount to the biggest buying wave since right after the 2000 presidential election, when officials rushed to replace discredited punch card machines with touchscreen voting equipment. Those machines are rapidly aging and are being replaced with machines that leave a paper backup as a result of security concerns about purely electronic voting.

Updated at 5:40 p.m. ET

Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp has quietly signed a sweeping overhaul of the way elections are administered in the state. It includes several provisions, backed by Democrats, to address concerns about how nonwhite voters are treated that were raised during Kemp's election last year.

Emmet Jopling Bondurant II knew about the civil rights movement when he was a student at the University of Georgia in the 1950s, but he didn't join it.

"I was trying to get through college," the burly, white-haired 82-year-old said in an interview. "And I'm embarrassed to say I was not involved. I should have been involved much sooner."

But, as a 26-year-old lawyer, he soon took part in one of the most important voting rights cases before the Supreme Court in the 1960s — one that ultimately required states to put equal numbers of people in congressional districts.

When Democrat Stacey Abrams ended her bid last week to become governor of Georgia and the first black woman ever elected governor of any state, she issued a stinging indictment of Georgia's voting system, a system overseen by her Republican opponent Brian Kemp, who was the state's top election official during the 2018 midterms.

"Democracy failed Georgia," said Abrams in a speech acknowledging Kemp would be the state's next governor.

Georgia will continue using its touchscreen voting machines ahead of the midterms despite security concerns about the technology, a U.S. District Court judge ordered late Monday.

But Judge Amy Totenberg rebuked Georgia and state election officials over their handling of election security.

Georgia is one of 14 states using machines that lack a paper trail that voters can verify for themselves.

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