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Education news and issues in the Ozarks.

What can amphibians tell us about human health?

Ben Dalton searches for salamanders

Under rocks and logs, in burrows and underwater, Dr. Alicia Mathis finds fascinating creatures to study. Mathis, head of the biology department at Missouri State University, focuses her research on the behaviors of tiny amphibians and fish. 

One of the most common things these animals need to communicate about is predation risk. It’s been understood for awhile that alarm cues are received and understood by animals of the same species and of different species – imagine a minnow and a stickleback – but her lab has uncovered some surprising results.

 

Nicki received a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Business Administration from Missouri State in marketing, in 2002 and 2004 respectively. After gaining experience in writing, marketing, special event planning, fundraising and public relations, she returned to the university to work in the office of strategic communication. There she tells the university’s story by sharing the stories of individuals at Missouri State.
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