Ozarks Alive: Time Capsule

Second Wednesday of each month at 7:45 am

“Ozarks Alive: Time Capsule” is a monthly radio feature highlighting poignant people and places that showcase traditions and history from throughout the region. Kaitlyn McConnell, author, historian and creator of the website “Ozarks Alive,” produces the radio program, airing the second Wednesday of each month at 7:45 a.m. on KSMU.   

Ozarks Alive is a web-based local history and culture preservation project. Begun in 2015 by McConnell, the site features articles about unique people and places throughout the region, as well as news that reflects changing times and the evolution of the Ozarks region.

Kaitlyn McConnell

Kaitlyn McConnell is the founder of Ozarks Alive, a website that is dedicated to the preservation and documentation of local culture and history. To visit the site, click here. Listen to the audio essay below.

When the night is still black and the stars are still awake, Kevin Wilkerson walks out to milk his cows. His arrival at the barn does more than earn him a living: it continues an Ozarks legacy.

Provided by Kaitlyn McConnell

Kaitlyn McConnell is the founder of Ozarks Alive, a website that is dedicated to the preservation and documentation of local culture and history. To visit the site, click here.

Buried deep in the hills of Douglas County is a nearly nonexistent town called Topaz. Serene scenery and a gushing spring say you’ve arrived, after traveling a crunchy gravel road. Perhaps some of those same stones carried locals who, in the past, brought their wheat to be ground at the town’s mill. 

Ozarks Alive: Time Capsule On Old-Time, Ozarks Fiddling

Nov 11, 2020
Ri Butov / Pixabay, Used with permission

In this premiere of our new radio feature, “Ozarks Alive: Time Capsule,” author and historian Kaitlyn McConnell brings us the past, present and future of old-time, Ozarks fiddling.  You can keep up with McConnell's travels and stories by going to www.OzarksAlive.com.  And listen to the radio feature below.

Old-time fiddle music has reverberated through Ozarks hills and hollows longer than anyone alive today can remember. For generations, these tunes – some passed down for centuries and from faraway lands - have brought communities together.