Marideth Sisco

Host of "These Ozarks Hills"

Marideth is a Missouri storyteller, veteran journalist, teacher, author, musician and student of folklore focusing on stories relevant to Ozarks culture and history.  Each month, she’s the voice behind "These Ozarks Hills.” Sisco spent 20 years as an investigative and environmental writer for the West Plains Quill and was well known for her gardening column, “Crosspatch,” on which her new book is based. Sisco was a music consultant and featured singer in the 2010 award-winning feature film “Winter's Bone.”

Marideth Sisco

In this month's segment of These Ozarks Hills, longtime storyteller and folklorist Marideth Sisco compares the region's pandemic recovery to its traditional response to a storm:  Ozarks residents dust off, then do what needs to be done. 

Lindsey Turner / Flickr

In this segment of These Ozarks Hills, longtime Ozarks storyteller and folklorist Marideth Sisco shares her reflections on the dawn of Spring after a dark, yearlong journey through the pandemic.  You can listen here:

File photo credit: lmaresz / Pixabay, Used with permission

In this episode of These Ozarks Hills, longtime storyteller Marideth Sisco reflects on how the human psyche deals with catastrophe, bringing in parallels between the 2020 pandemic a major earthquake that occurred decades earlier. 

Roy Harryman via Pixabay / Used with permission

In this episode of These Ozarks Hills, master storyteller and folklorist Marideth Sisco reflects on the humorous, flawed ways some of us Ozarkers have spoken about our anxieties in the past. 

Listen to the episode below:

Alissa Zhu, Derived from Adam Bartlett / (Flickr)

In her monthly radio essay, These Ozarks Hills, longtime storyteller Marideth Sisco peels back the layers of time—as well as limestone and soil—to once again appreciate the wondrous geology that makes up our region.

You can hear the audio essay by clicking the "Play" icon below.

F.D. Richards / Flickr

In this segment of KSMU's monthly program These Ozarks Hills, master storyteller and folklorist Marideth Sisco reflects on the protests and turmoil of the country as seen from her youth, and wonders if America can unite the way it once did.

Listen to the essay here:

KSMU

In this segment of These Ozarks Hills on KSMU, longtime Ozarks storyteller Marideth Sisco ponders whether the days pre-coronavirus are really what we should aspire to return to. 

You can hear the audio segment here: 

Westsubindy / Flickr, Used with permission

In this episode of These Ozarks Hills, longtime storyteller Marideth Sisco encourages those who are alone right now to think of solitude, rather than isolation. Hear the audio from the segment below:

Beth Scupham via Flickr / Creative Commons, Used with Permission

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills. Once again, as we come into the shadow of the Long Dark, the giant clock that marks our time on this planet is winding down with an almost audible ticking. We feel it in our bones, the tap, the beat, the sound of days ratcheting away.

Surely that’s one cause for our frenetic dashing about this month, grabbing the tree, the turkey, one more present for the pile, chestnuts for the fire, satsumas for the stockings.

Missouri Department of Conservation

With Halloween just past, and all these other holidays stacked up here as the year comes around toward the close, I’ve just realized there’s one that should be on the calendar about here, but it isn’t. It might fit best on the weather calendar, because every single year in the Ozarks, somewhere in the middle of our weather going through its seasonal acrobatics, on or about Halloween or thereabouts, there are persimmons in the forecast.No kidding. Just bear with me.

Ian Sane via Flickr / Creative Commons / Used with permission

This is Marideth Sisco for These Ozarks Hills.  Try as I might, although I always yearn for Autumn, I cannot await its coming without realizing that it signals more than anything the end of things. Not everything. But some. Several. And certainly some I am loth to see depart.

KSMU

In this segment of These Ozarks Hills, storyteller and musician Marideth Sisco shares her personal observation of the history of naming Hurricanes, and asks Ozarks residents to honor their old tradition of stepping up to help others in need as Hurricane Dorian brings significant damage to thousands of people.  She ends by singing a song she wrote on the nature of hard times, and how it relates to the people of this land.

You can hear the segment here:

Meaghan O'Malley / Flickr

In this month's segment of our series These Ozarks Hills, master storyteller Marideth Sisco evaluates her own family history and subliminal psychology behind hoarding food--and what she refers to as "Depression Thinking."

MRHSfan / via Flickr, Creative Commons

In this segment of These Ozarks hills, storyteller and Ozarks native Marideth Sisco reflects on tornadic Ozarks storms past, present and future after this week’s outbreak on Tuesday.

You can listen to the essay by clicking the “Play” button below.

KSMU

In this segmet of These Ozarks Hills,  storyteller and Ozarks native Marideth Sisco is on her way back from a cousin's funeral, where she was reminded of her deep roots and familial journey. 

You can listen to the essay by clicking the "Play" button below.

Pages