Burrell Behavioral Health

“If people have seen the movie Thelma and Louise, and at the end of the movie, they drive their car right off the cliff.  That’s what it’s like for me at times”, says Carolyn Crawford.  “When I know I’m going into a manic state, I have to stop and say ‘Wait a Minute’, and pull back from the cliff.  That’s how it affects me.  But I really didn’t know what it was”, Crawford said.   

Liz Delany/KGBX

“I hear the comments,” said KGBX Morning Host Liz Delany. “You know, 'She’s a little crazy.  Oop, don’t make her mad, she’s on medication.' Or, 'Sometimes she’s a little imbalanced, she might be having one of those days.'   I guess if I was a 'normal' person, if you will, I might say something like that,” Delany said.  

Branson Police Department

An effort in Branson by multiple agencies is aimed at preventing overdose deaths.  The Overdose Response Team was formed in January.  It’s a partnership between the Branson Police Department and the Missouri Coalition for Community Behavioral Health.  That includes Burrell Behavioral Health, the Stone and Taney County Substance Use Initiative and the Combined Ozarks Multi-Jurisdictional Enforcement Team.

Branson Police lieutenant, Sean Barnwell, said the team was formed after they started seeing an increase in overdose calls.

Courtesy of Rhonda Mammen

This week on Making Democracy Work, host Lisa Langley speaks with Rhonda Mammen, director of counseling services at Springfield Public Schools.

Today’s discussion explores growing mental health concerns in area youth and how SPS is partnering with Burrell to address those needs in the school.

Exceptional Warriors

“PTSD and Traumatic Brain Injury, that’s basically the wound of Iraq and Afghanistan.  The signature wound, if you will, is the TBI," said Anthony Norris, a graduate of Nixa High School.

On this edition of "Let’s Talk About It! Normalizing Mental Health Conversations," from the ongoing KSMU series Making a Difference, we hear about the mental health journey Norris finds himself on.

In 2006 during his senior year at Drury University, Norris chose to delay graduation and pharmacy school, to join the U.S. Army. 

Jennifer Moore / KSMU

Many children have escaped the trauma of domestic violence and are living with a parent in the Harmony House shelter in east Springfield. Harmony House serves anywhere between 30 and 50 children at any given time. 

And that trauma can impact a child’s education.

Tony LaBellarte is the Children’s Case Manager at Harmony House. 

Randy Bacon Photography Submitted By Tim and Mary Jane Holmes

You're listening to KSMU, and this is Making a Difference.

The Springfield Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavioral Health, Cox Health, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center. 

Aaron Scott / Community Foundation of the Ozarks

You're listening to KSMU, and this is Making a Difference.

The Springfield Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavorial Health, Cox Health, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center. 

Roy Blunt
Scott Harvey / KSMU

U.S. Sen. Roy Blunt says “Nothing will be more innovative than treating behavioral health like all other health.”  

That’s the goal behind the Excellence in Mental Care Act, which the Missouri Republican introduced alongside Michigan Democratic Sen. Debbie Stabenow in 2014. It puts community mental health centers on an equal footing with other health centers.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

Nearly 17 percent of Greene County students grades six-12 considered attempting suicide within the past year. That’s according to a student survey conducted by Missouri Department of Mental Health.

And officials say the threat of suicide has been on the rise.

Michele Skalicky

The name of the subject in this story has been altered to protect his identity

"Ryan" is addicted to heroin.  He wished to remain anonymous, but he wanted to share his story, which began at age 14 when a friend offered him hydrocodone, a prescription opioid, that the boy had been prescribed for a toothache.  The 25-year-old was only nine when his mom passed away from cancer, and, although he’d gone to counseling, he’d never found a way to deal with the trauma. 

reference.com

The name of the person in this story struggling with addiction has been changed to protect his identity

Prescription opioids help people deal with pain, but more and more people are abusing them, and some are dying from their addiction.  According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, prescription opioids, such as hydrocodone and oxycodone, continue to be involved in more overdose deaths than any other drug.  And prescription drug abuse is a key risk factor for heroin addiction.

Michele Skalicky

Opioids, both prescription and illicit, are the main driver of drug overdose deaths in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.   More than 33,000 people died in the United States in 2015 from opioid overdoses, the latest year for which numbers are available. 

Greene County had 97 overdose deaths in 2015, and, of those, 61 were opioid-related.

Springfield Business Journal

Springfield has lost a healthcare leader and advocate for the mentally ill.

Dr. Todd Schaible, president and CEO of Burrell Behavioral Health, passed away over the weekend following a fall at his home last week. He was appointed Burrell’s CEO at its beginning in 1977 and was the organization’s leader for nearly 40 years.

Sen. Roy Blunt
Scott Harvey / KSMU Archives

U.S. Senator Roy Blunt (R-Missouri) is continuing his push to expand the Excellence in Mental Health Act. Blunt joined law enforcement and mental health officials in Springfield Tuesday to discuss the program.  

“There are 24 states that would like to be the pilot states who, in the properly defined facilities, right kind of staff and 24/7 availability, would make the government, as the payer, treat mental health the same as other health,” Blunt said.

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