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Arts and Entertainment

Springfield Art Museum to Showcase Work of Popular Painter

http://ozarkspub.vo.llnwd.net/o37/KSMU/audio/mp3/springfiel_4317.mp3

Art lovers are in for a treat this Friday. Several new exhibits will be opening at the Springfield Art Museum. In addition, the museum will hold a preview reception for the works of a nationally acclaimed painter. KSMU’s Benjamin Fry visited the museum and files this report.

“I’m here in one of the exhibition galleries where several oil-on-canvas paintings have recently been placed. Each one mixes several different colors to create a unique mood. The centerpiece of the room is mostly done in yellow, and pink and light grey and sort of evokes a warmness. A smaller painting over here blends dark purple, blue and orange and kind of reminds me of a dark thunderstorm. The artist behind these creations is Jon Schueler, who wanted his paintings to evoke a feeling of nature”

“And I just thought it would be nice to bring in some larger pieces to show some abstract work”

Sarah Buhr is the Curator of Exhibitions at the Springfield Art Museum.

She says she first looked into the possibility of showcasing Schueler’s work about a year and a half ago.

That’s when she got the job as curator, and ever since, then she’s been looking forward to bringing this artist’s paintings to Springfield.

Jon Schueler was born in 1916 and fought in WWII.

He lived in New York, though he spent part of the year in Scotland until his death in 1992.

Buhr says Schueler’s tumultuous life was part of what shaped his creativity. “He was in the war, he just sort of had this very temperamental personality, had four or five marriages, just a lot of crazy things happened in his life and you see that in his paintings and his paintings were really the only thing that he could focus on,” Buhr said.

Buhr says Schueler’s nature-esque pictures were usually inspired by what he saw in the skies over New York or Scotland.

She says those who are familiar with Ozarks weather can appreciate what they see on Schueler’s canvases.

“And then sometimes the skies look like our skies even though they were painted in Scotland because the weather here is so crazy, and there’s definitely a connection between the two, I think for residents here who are used to the sort of day to day changes and the crazy weather here,” Buhr said.

The reception will take place Friday evening at the Springfield Art Museum from 5:30 to 7:00.

Food and drink will be provided.

Schueler’s widow, Magda Salvesen will be at the event to talk about her husband’s art.

This exhibit will run through the end of May.

For KSMU News, I’m Benjamin Fry.