Missouri Agriculture and Climate Change

Data from NOAA and the Missouri Climate Center show the number of weather events that produced three or more inches of rain has increased by 35 percent, comparing the past two decades to the long-term average. And global temperatures have increased 1.9 degrees Farenheit since 1880, according to NASA's Vital Signs of the Planet.   Missouri's farmers are scrambling to deal with more frequent floods and drought. KSMU's local series investigates how the changing climate is impacting Missouri's top industry: agriculture. 

Missouri Farm Bureau

Global temperatures have increased 1.9 degrees Farenheit since 1880, and 19 of the 20 warmest years on record have occurred since 2001, according to data provided by NASA's Vital Signs of the Planet. 

And those changes are affecting Missouri’s top industry:  agriculture.    

Michele Skalicky

  

Missouri Farmers are trying to work around more frequent floods and drought, which scientists say are the result of climate change.  The Missouri Department of Agriculture said it doesn’t currently have anyone in the department looking at the impact of climate change on the state’s top industry, so many farmers are trying to figure out solutions on their own.  

Ideker Farms/KWMU

Farmers in Missouri are facing increased challenges as the result of climate change, especially heavy rainfall events.  Last year, flooding on the Missouri River left cropland underwater and idle for most of the summer. 

Michele Skalicky

 

Missouri has seen more episodes of extreme weather in recent years, and that’s having an impact on the state’s top industry:  agriculture.  Farmers have been battling increased flooding and drought.

According to data from NOAA and the Missouri Climate Center, the number of weather events that produced three or more inches of rain has increased by 35 percent, comparing the past two decades to the long-term average.