Health

Health news and issues in the Ozarks.

Joe Loong / Flickr

The training this weekend  is part of the national campaign, Stop the Bleed, which gained momentum after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut in 2012, according to Mercy Hospital Springfield.

"A bunch of the leaders in the nation got together and thought, 'how can we stop people from dying from preventable deaths with just some basic hemorrhage techniques for that life threatening bleeding situation?'" said Keith Schaefer, director of Trauma Services at Mercy Hospital Springfield.

CoxHealth

A local hospital is trying to get the word out:  don’t automatically resort to antibiotics each time you’re sick.

CoxHealth is putting up signs and printing brochures to get the word out.  Ryan Baker, the Ambulatory Care Director for CoxHealth, says taking antibiotics indiscriminately can cause a lot of pathogens to react in ways that can make therapies ineffective.

In other words, he says, nature finds a way to get around obstacles.

Cox Health South
Chloe O'Neill / KSMU

 

 

  CoxHealth and Community Partnership of the Ozarks are implementing a new software system that will allow several different parties to team up in getting services to those in need. 

The software, called ServicePoint, will allow CoxHealth and CPO to refer patients and clients to other local agencies like Jordan Valley Community Health Center and the public health department. 

dominik18s / Flickr

A food drive in Southwest Missouri is aimed at making sure even those who can’t afford to buy healthy food can get it.

This is the sixth year for CoxHealth’s Pack the Pantry healthy food drive, and the health system is asking for the community’s help.

Glenda Miller, CoxHealth’s collaborative care coordinator and food drive organizer, says they want to “support those who need some extra help obtaining the food necessary for a heart-healthy diet.”

Marissa Anderson / Flickr

Hurricane Maria damaged more than 100 drug and medical device manufacturing facilities on Puerto Rico, according to an NPR report.  Because of that, hospitals are having to find ways to deal with shortages of certain drugs and medical products. 

"We have been impacted primarily in regards to small-volume I.V. bags," said Jennifer Reeves, operations director for pharmacy services at CoxHealth.

eCraig4 / Flickr

A new partnership between Parents as Teachers and CoxHealth has a parent educator working alongside medical providers in a Springfield doctors’ office. 

Brandi Saxton, manager of CoxHealth’s Northside Pediatrics Clinic where the educator, Amanda Coleman, is located, says the purpose is to improve outcomes for children that may have some developmental delays.

Coleman works at the clinic on Mondays and Fridays and conducts developmental screenings on 18-month-olds and three-year-olds.

It’s important, she said, to intervene early if a child is having problems.

Mercy Springfield
Chloe O'Neil / KSMU

Mercy Springfield says the interim president of its regional hospital system will remain in the role for the foreseeable future.

According to a news release, the organization said it informed staff Wednesday that Jon Swope will continue as interim president of Mercy Springfield Communities and Dr. Alan Scarrow will return to practicing medicine full-time as a neurosurgeon. Scarrow had served as president for three years.

Updated Nov. 27 with federal decision — Following an investigation and subsequent layoffs, Mercy Hospital Springfield is no longer at risk of losing federal funding due to reports of patient abuse. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services gave notice this month that the southwest Missouri hospital has achieved compliance with patient care standards after implementing a corrective plan.

Kathryn Decker / Flickr

CoxHealth has more than 200 positions open, and it will showcase them and meet prospective employees during a career fair next week.

The event, from 4 to 6 p.m. Tuesday (10/24) in Cox South’s West Tower Lobby, will give candidates a chance to meet leaders and learn about job openings.   

Free food and prizes will be available, and hiring leaders will attend to meet with applicants.

Michele Skalicky

CoxHealth brought an educator to the Keeter Center at College of the Ozarks on Friday to give advice to area prescribers.  Dr. Ted Parran, an internal medicine physician and professor at Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, presented a systematic approach to assessing whether or not it’s safe to prescribe controlled drugs to a patient.

He said physicians must play a key role in addressing the public health crisis that prescription drug abuse has become.

Summer Survival Tips to Avoid Heat Related Illness

Jun 19, 2017
KSMU archives

Heat related illness led to 25 deaths last year in Missouri, according to the state’s department of health. Officials are advising how to stay safe during Summer Weather Safety Week.

Stella Falconer, the quality nurse specialist for Mercy Springfield’s emergency room, says, “Typically we see between 40-50 people each summer, primarily heat exhaustion or milder symptoms. We do on occasion get heat stroke, the more severe, life threatening.”

Cox College
Google Maps

Cox College says it wants to raise $6.6 million to update its facilities and expand training services at its north Springfield location.

The organization announced Friday that the renovations could eventually allow for another 25-50 nursing students each year.

According to a news release, the Cox Foundation launched the capital campaign a month ago and has already received $1.4 million from several lead donors.  

A planned merger between Bolivar’s Citizens Memorial Hospital and Springfield’s CoxHealth has been canceled.

The two healthcare organizations announced today they’ve decided the timing is not right for the partnership.

Mercy Springfield
Scott Harvey / KSMU

Mercy Hospital Springfield and Mercy Clinic Springfield Communities have agreed to pay $34 million to resolve a lawsuit related to physician compensation.

According to a statement issued Thursday by the U.S. Justice Department, the healthcare organization allegedly violated the False Claims Act through improper payments to oncologists.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

“So we’re gonna go ahead and go live… Hey! How we doing?” announces David Stoecker via a Facebook Live session on February 24. There are about a dozen monitoring the feed from a digital device, while a handful of us watch Stoecker in person from inside the Springfield Recovery Community Center.

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