Springfield City Council

Covering policy decisions, issues from Springfield City Council.

Boris Kasimov / Flickr

A proposed Careless and Distracted Ordinance for Springfield has been referred to the city’s Plans and Policies Committee for further review.  City Councilman Matthew Simpson made the motion to do so.  He said, while he believes distracted driving is an issue for the city, he believes it’s “not prudent” to move forward with it.  He made that decision, he said, based on discussion by council members, feedback they’ve received and legal guidance.

KSMU / KSMU Archives

Applications are being accepted for the Zone 4 Springfield City Council seat.  Craig Fishel resigned from that position last week.

The city clerk’s office will accept applications Monday through Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. through February 16. 

Michele Skalicky

Motorists in the city limits of Springfield can now be pulled over for not wearing their seat belts.  This week, Springfield City Council approved a bill that allows for primary enforcement of seat belt violations.  Prior to this, a person would have to be pulled over for another violation before a citation for not wearing a seat belt could be issued.

Council member, Kristi Fulnecky, opposed the bill and said it’s unnecessary.

Henry Burrows / Flickr

You’ll now be able to drink alcoholic beverages in nine Springfield-Greene County Park Board facilities. 

Springfield City Council Monday approved an amendment in city code removing the restriction of alcohol in public parks.  Alcohol is still prohibited in 95 parks locations after the Springfield-Greene County Park Board approved a new park regulation prior to City Council’s vote.

Google Maps

One change to city code allows police officers to ticket pedestrians for crossing the street outside of a crosswalk one half hour after sunset to one half hour before sunrise.  The bill adds language saying motorists must yield to pedestrians crossing in designated crosswalks or face a minimum fine of $100. 

Stacy / Flickr

The recently-passed pit bull ban in Springfield will go before voters next August. 

Springfield City Council voted Monday not to repeal the ban put in place in October but, instead, voted to let the public decide.

Council member Kristi Fulnecky made a motion to move the election up to April, but that motion failed.

The ban is on hold for now.

Fulnecky was the only dissenting vote on the ordinance placing the issue on the ballot.  She says it was a slap in the face to constituents to not repeal the ban.

mbarrison / Flickr

During a luncheon Tuesday, Springfield City Council heard from Springfield-Greene County Health Department director, Clay Goddard, about universal licensure where all dogs would be required to be licensed.

sally9258

Springfield City Council has approved a future ban on pit bull dogs in the city limits. The decision was 5-4.

The ordinance also establishes a minimum fine for violations of the pit bull provisions.  Those include keeping pit bull puppies born to dogs currently in the city once they turn eight weeks old.

Councilman Richard Ollis explained why he planned to vote against the measure.

Eric Norris / Flickr

Springfield doctors and pharmacists will have a new tool to use when prescribing and handing out opiates and opioids.  Springfield City Council approved the implementation of a prescription drug monitoring program for the city Monday night. Hours later, Greene County commissioners approved a database county-wide.

The PDMP will be part of the St. Louis Consortium and will be voluntary for physicians to use and mandatory for pharmacists, according to City Councilman Dr. Tom Prater, who said it will be important in being able to evaluate a patient's needs.

frankieleon / Flickr

Springfield City Council could vote in just under two weeks on a prescription drug monitoring program for the city.  A public hearing last night brought those for and against a PDMP before council.

Katie Towns, assistant director of health for the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, said implementing a program locally would help in the fight against opioid addiction.

Springfield Wants to Curb Use of Harmful Sealants

Jun 16, 2017
St. Joseph County / Quote_Parking Lot Services

The city of Springfield is voluntarily refraining from using coal tar based sealants (CTBS) at its facilities after studies suggest they can be harmful to streams and aquatic life.

The City Council’s Community Involvement Committee met on Tuesday to discuss an alternative method of the compound. The CTBS contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), a group of chemicals that can be found in products made from fossil fuels.

healthline.com

An ordinance to implement a prescription drug monitoring program in Springfield will go to the full city council for a vote after a council committee--the Community Involvement Committee—unanimously agreed Tuesday to take that action.

Before the vote, the Springfield-Greene County Health Department and Springfield’s Healthy Living Alliance recommended moving forward with the ordinance.

Springfield is planning to join a largely state-wide effort to receive a federal grant to implement a PDMP.  The grant would cover the cost of a program for the first two years.

Richard Ollis
Ollis/Akers/Arney website

The Springfield City Council Tuesday chose Richard Ollis, an insurance company CEO, to fill the General Seat D post.

The seat became vacant after the April election of councilmen Ken McClure as mayor.

Ollis, 56, is the CEO of Ollis/Akers/Arney, where he serves a risk and insurance advisor. The company, according to its website, is Springfield’s largest independent insurance agency.

Ollis was chosen among five other candidates that council had interviewed for the post. 

Scott Harvey

Springfield City Council has taken steps towards deciding what to do about the Jefferson Avenue Footbridge.  During a workshop Tuesday night they looked at five options, presented by Spencer Jones, an engineer with Great River Engineering:

A.) Do Nothing.  Demolition of the bridge is estimated to cost $410,000

B.) Minimal Rehab with Future Replacement.  The option includes a minimal rehab today with a replacement structure in 2029.  Initial cost would be $2.3 million with a cumulative cost of $10.9 million

Jason Bacon

A measure that would have stricken the part of Springfield City Code Chapter 18 prohibiting pit bulls will get further study.

The bill was scheduled to be voted on at last night’s Springfield City Council meeting.  But Zone One council member, Phyllis Ferguson, made a motion to refer it to the Plans and Policies Committee.  She said residents in her part of the city didn’t have adequate opportunity to comment on it.

"Which causes me some heartburn to vote tonight," she said.

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