Sense of Community

Atchison Daily Globe

A woman’s alleged horseback ride through a small Ozarks boomtown in 1913 caught the attention of newspapers throughout the Midwest.

The Atchison Daily Globe in Kansas was one of the many newspapers to publish the shocking story of a bizarre night gone wrong in Old Horton, Missouri. The small community was in a part of the Mark Twain National Forest in Howell County near Cabool.

Here’s part of the newspaper’s account:

(courtesy wikipedia.org)

This is the story of a mysterious man, a pianist and music teacher by profession, who showed up in the small Northwest Arkansas town of Cincinnati in Washington County in the 1870s. He went by the name of Edwin Dolgoruki—sometimes reported as “G. Dolgoruki,” but usually as Edwin. But to this day no one is sure of who the man was, where he actually came from, or what was his real story.

(courtesy Minneapolis Star and www.ozarksalive.com)

Former Springfield News-Leader columnist Mike O’Brien wrote in May of 2001 that in 1946, a publishing house in Kansas put out a 32-page booklet called “True Stories of Peculiar People and Unusual Events in the Ozarks.”  It was written by former Kansas City newspaper reporter William R. Draper.

(Photo: Randy Stewart)

As part of their mandate to provide programming that encourages family reading and literacy, since 2011 the non-profit Missouri Humanities Council has also provided opportunities for military veterans and their families in St. Louis, Kansas City and Springfield to participate in creative writing workshops.

(Photo: Randy Stewart)

After returning home from active duty, many military veterans choose to attend college, whether it’s a community college, trade school, or a full-fledged university.  And there are people and programs ready to help them take that step. We’re exploring educational opportunities for veterans on this edition of “Sense of Community.”

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