Missouri State Journal

Many runners find themselves drawn to races and long runs – like marathons. But how do you begin to tackle the intense physical and mental hurdles that come?  

Dr. Sara Powell, assistant professor of kinesiology at Missouri State University, says that the distance is just one of the challenges to crossing the finish line.

In addition to getting fitted for good footwear, Powell provides some tips for training:

Battling a sedentary mindset? Ready to get active?

Dr. Sara Powell is ready to help you set some goals. 

Powell, assistant professor in the kinesiology department at Missouri State University, encourages people to not take on too much too soon, as it’s a recipe for being discouraged.

Even if you’re working out with a partner, Powell emphasizes that you should set individual goals. Genetics, body type, physical abilities and diet are all unique to you, so you shouldn’t compare yourself, she says. 

Whether you’re a CEO, public relations professional, truck driver or preschool student, you are always communicating. Intentionally or not. Verbally or nonverbally. You have the skill the moment you enter the world.

Dr. Carrisa Hoelscher, director of graduate communication studies at Missouri State University, sets her target on competent communication to help others improve their skill.

Society has developed into a difficult place for many individuals with autism. Socialization and communication are fundamental, and these skills can be a hurdle.

Dr. Megan Boyle, associate professor of special education at Missouri State University, is a board-certified behavior analyst. She runs a clinic for children with autism spectrum disorders and prepares the next generation of educators for behavior issues in the classroom.

Individuals with autism experience the world differently, and often have challenges with social situations or communication.

Dr. Megan Boyle, associate professor of special education at Missouri State University, is a board-certified behavior analyst. She runs a clinic for children with autism spectrum disorders and prepares the next generation of educators for behavior issues in the classroom.

Hip-hop is its own unique culture, complete with music, fashion and art.

Dr. Ashley Payne, assistant professor of psychology at Missouri State University, studies hip-hop based education and identity development of Black adolescent girls and college-aged women.

We all know that physical activity is good for us and necessary for a healthy lifestyle. So why do we let it falter?

Dr. Sara Powell focuses on sport and exercise psychology in the department of kinesiology at Missouri State University.

Even outside of the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals struggle with mental barriers to initiating and maintaining a physical activity routine, Powell noted.

Higher education continually needs to innovate to recruit and retain its students while making education accessible to more people. Sometimes this involves new programming, scholarships and other resources. Other times, it is reimagining curriculum and standards.

Systemic racism: It’s even present in the way we gather data.

Dr. Kyler Sherman-Wilkins, assistant professor of sociology at Missouri State University, recently gained grant funding to incorporate anti-racism modules into his statistics and methods course. works to empower more people of color on the university’s campus and one step is incorporating anti-racism into the curriculum.

The grant funding will be used to assist with resource building and professional development.

Music tells a story. It is a narrative that inspires and moves many. 

Daniel Ketter and Emlyn Johnson, faculty from the department of music at Missouri State University, share about their work with Music in the American Wild and how they are celebrating the Centennial of the women's suffrage movement.

They began Music in the America Wild in 2016 as a celebration of the National Park Service Centennial.

Unless you have a medical background, you likely feel slightly uneasy and confused when you, or a loved one, are in the hospital or are facing a new diagnosis. As doctors, and others on the care team, spout off procedures, you may catch only a portion. 

Tara Stulce and Jeanie Skibiski from the McQueary College of Health and Human Services at Missouri State University participate in an interdisciplinary committee that focuses on healthcare teams and creating better overall cooperation and communication among team members.

Do you have something you hope to change or build upon this year in your life?

If you've ever struggled to make a substantial life change, it might be because you're too focused on correcting your weaknesses rather than investing in your strengths. That's according to Clifton Strengths Finder.

Nora Cox, senior instructor of communication at Missouri State University, is a certified Strengths Finder coach. She says awareness of ourselves makes us more productive at whatever we hope to achieve.

To even the playing field and to break the cycle of poverty, Missouri State University has taken a stance. The university is making it easier to access a college education, because we know that higher education helps people overcome socio-economic boundaries, and achieve personal and professional success.

Part of getting ready for college is imagining yourself there. But some students don’t have a clear idea of what that looks like.

Maybe he would be a first-generation college student. Maybe his school districts doesn’t have the resources for the fields he dreams of. Maybe he believes he has to declare a major when he walks on campus in order to be successful.

"Oh, what a beautiful morning" – it's just one of the many iconic songs attributed to the team of Rogers and Hammerstein. In their first collaboration, they created "Oklahoma!" It's romance, Western and a piece of legendary Americana that many can quote by heart.

Missouri State University students will perform in the world premiere concert version of "Oklahoma!" alongside the Springfield Symphony this Nov. 9-10.

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