Mind's Eye

Not seeing eye to eye with someone? Need to find a solution without going to the courts? Dr. Stan Leasure, business law professor at Missouri State University, says alternative dispute methods might be your best bet.

The sustainability movement continues to grow and evolve. Individuals are more concerned than ever about the source of their foods, materials and products they purchase. This focus has caused many industries to look closely at their processes, products and byproducts – ultimately to improve themselves and improve the reputation of the organization as a whole.

Each November, Native American Heritage Month is recognized with the goal of affirming and celebrating the identities of individuals who are often erased from history. Dr. Billie Follensbee, museum studies program coordinator in the art and design department at Missouri State University, has had a lifelong fascination with Native American history, art and archaeology.

Picture yourself in a national park like Denali, the Everglades or Yellowstone.

What comes to mind?

Dr. Judith Meyer, a historical geographer at Missouri State University, wants to know how you experience that landscape and why. 

She has long been fascinated with Yellowstone, where she served as a tour guide for several summers. One of her research interests is what she calls the sense of place.

If you suffer from migraine or other orofacial pain like TMD, it's no surprise that poor sleep routines, stress, lack of exercise and a sedentary desk job all increase your risk for these painful events.

Bullying and diversity are two hot topics, and they relate directly to the research of Dr. Adena Young-Jones, associate professor of psychology at Missouri State. She developed curriculum for a Psychology of Diverse Populations course, which allows students to discover subconscious preferences, evaluating these subtle prejudices so that they may grow past them.

Read the full Mind's Eye story on her research

Inspiration can come from anything: an object of affection, heartbreak, world events, poetry. The list goes on.  Dr. John Prescott, composer and professor of music at Missouri State University, was asked to create a memorial piece of music to be performed on the 15th anniversary of 9/11, and he obliged.

Ligon with alligator snapping turtle
Submitted by Dr. Day Ligon

Conducting research to aid the conservation of a species whose numbers have declined is often challenging precisely because they are scarce. For animals that are naturally secretive, they are even more difficult to detect and therefore study. One such species is the alligator snapping turtle which after decades of population decline has been petitioned for federal listing as an endangered species three times. These large turtles are of particular interest to Dr.

You’ve survived a major catastrophe. While the world you know - including your home, familiar places and potentially your loved ones - have been washed away in this natural disaster, you remain. How do you cope? How do you look at the world? What actions do you take to get your shattered life back together? This ability to bounce back is your resiliency.

Under rocks and logs, in burrows and underwater, Dr. Alicia Mathis finds fascinating creatures to study. Mathis, head of the biology department at Missouri State University, focuses her research on the behaviors of tiny amphibians and fish. 

One of the most common things these animals need to communicate about is predation risk. It’s been understood for awhile that alarm cues are received and understood by animals of the same species and of different species – imagine a minnow and a stickleback – but her lab has uncovered some surprising results.

 

From the beginning, Reesha Adamson could sense her calling. She wanted to improve the lives of young people – those of elementary school age, especially – who have behavioral disorders such as oppositional behaviors, depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifest themselves in learning environments. Adamson, who is an assistant professor of special education at Missouri State University, explains her educational philosophy and why it's such an important issue for her.

The Ozarks Writing Project (OWP), housed in the English department within the College of Arts and Letters, is a collaborative program between Missouri State University and the National Writing Project (NWP), the premier effort to improve writing in America. It’s about working with teachers in all disciplines, kindergarten through university, to improve writing skills and to empower teachers to share their expertise.

Adamson, assistant professor of special education at Missouri State University, is working with local public schools to help a small section of students who struggle with following through on classroom engagement and aren’t learning at the same rate as their peers. Such students may have educational behavioral disorders, which differs from medical behavioral disorders. The question is whether the disorder affects performance in the classroom – not because the student isn’t capable of the workload, but because they can’t sustain until the class ends. 

How well do you know Missouri’s small towns? Bruce West, photography professor in the art and design department at Missouri State, learned so much about Mississippi in his formulation of his book, “The True Gospel Preached Here,” that it inspired him to learn more about the place he now calls home.

This former East Coaster is trolling around small towns in Missouri to learn more about the state and the humanity of its inhabitants.

Is there a more haunting question than 'what if?' In Bruce Wes's life - a professor of art and design at Missouri State University - his 'what if' takes him back to a road trip through rural Mississippi during a sabbatical in 1994. What he found there became an inspiration for his 18 year photographic journey turned exhibit and book, "The True Gospel Preached Here."

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