McQueary College of Health and Human Services

How do kids build friendships and navigate bullying in schools? Dr. Leslie Echols, Missouri State University associate professor of psychology, is trying to find out with her latest research project.

Hip-hop is its own unique culture, complete with music, fashion and art.

Dr. Ashley Payne, assistant professor of psychology at Missouri State University, studies hip-hop based education and identity development of Black adolescent girls and college-aged women.

We all know that physical activity is good for us and necessary for a healthy lifestyle. So why do we let it falter?

Dr. Sara Powell focuses on sport and exercise psychology in the department of kinesiology at Missouri State University.

Even outside of the COVID-19 pandemic, individuals struggle with mental barriers to initiating and maintaining a physical activity routine, Powell noted.

Higher education continually needs to innovate to recruit and retain its students while making education accessible to more people. Sometimes this involves new programming, scholarships and other resources. Other times, it is reimagining curriculum and standards.

A healthy breakfast of hummus on whole wheat bread with assorted fruits.
Bernadette Wurzinger from Pixabay

Many of us would like to eat healthier and shed some pounds.

But making those things happen can prove to be a huge challenge – even when we’re motivated by a New Year’s resolution.

Natalie Allen, registered dietitian and clinical assistant professor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, offers some tips and advice on how you can succeed at eating healthier in the new year.

Unless you have a medical background, you likely feel slightly uneasy and confused when you, or a loved one, are in the hospital or are facing a new diagnosis. As doctors, and others on the care team, spout off procedures, you may catch only a portion. 

Tara Stulce and Jeanie Skibiski from the McQueary College of Health and Human Services at Missouri State University participate in an interdisciplinary committee that focuses on healthcare teams and creating better overall cooperation and communication among team members.

The holidays present us with an abundance of food, so it’s easy to overeat. To avoid eating too much and packing on extra pounds, it’s helpful to make a plan and stick with it.

Natalie Allen, a registered dietitian and clinical instructor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, offers tips and advice about eating healthy this holiday season.

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Opioids are commonly prescribed for those with a total knee replacement. But with the increased attention turned to the abuse of these narcotics, a new method was approved a few years ago: cryoneurolysis.

"Cryoneurolysis takes the nerve just to the point of slightly damaging, basically bruising it, so that it doesn't conduct the painful impulses anymore," said Dr. Jeanie Skibiski, assistant professor in the School of Anesthesia at Missouri State University.

Victimization happens when a person is on the receiving end of cruel or unjust treatment.

According to a Science Daily article, “researchers estimate that as many as 75% of children and youth report experiencing some sort of peer victimization, with 10 to 15% experiencing more severe and prolonged victimization."

In every sport, athletes risk injury. Athletic trainers support and assist these athletes to lower that possibility. They help them warm up, stretch and prepare the body for rigorous action.

Dr. David Carr, associate professor in the department of sports medicine and athletic training at Missouri State University, shares a story about a tragedy that highlights why adequate medical training is important on the sidelines.

What species of ticks live in Missouri and in what quantities?

Dr. David Claborn, director of the Master of Public Health program at Missouri State University, is trying to answer these questions through his latest tick surveillance project. It’s made possible through a grant from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Claborn highlights his research and shares some facts about ticks.

Nowadays, many people practice intermittent fasting, also known as IF, to lose weight and get fit.

What exactly is IF? How do you do IF? How does this diet plan help with weight loss? 

Natalie Allen, registered dietitian and clinical instructor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, and Leah Brooke, a Missouri State dietetic intern, answer these questions and more.

Pixabay / Used with permission

The keto diet has become one of the most popular diets today. However, this diet is not without controversy.

Researchers are studying whether this diet, which promotes eating high-fat foods, could cause harmful effects in the long run.

Natalie Allen, registered dietitian and clinical instructor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, and Leah Brooke, a Missouri State dietetic intern, explain more about the keto diet.

Having a stroke or a traumatic brain injury can make you feel like a foreigner in a strange land. Your cognition may still be fully intact, but sometimes you just can't speak the language.

After a stroke, most individuals need speech therapy, something that is offered free at Missouri State University's Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, and they often recoup much of their language. If you haven't recouped it all, you may become your own worse critic. This makes it difficult to engage in everyday social situations. You may feel embarrassed and become isolated.

Pouring milk into a glass.
Martin Vorel (https://libreshot.com)

In general, we all need to drink about eight glasses of fluid a day. Besides water, milk is a great drink choice for people of all ages.

Nowadays, there are many different types of milk available and choosing which one to buy can be a tad overwhelming.

Natalie Allen, registered dietitian and clinical instructor of biomedical sciences at Missouri State University, discusses the benefits of milk and the varieties available.

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