college of education

Individuals with autism experience the world differently, and often have challenges with social situations or communication.

Dr. Megan Boyle, associate professor of special education at Missouri State University, is a board-certified behavior analyst. She runs a clinic for children with autism spectrum disorders and prepares the next generation of educators for behavior issues in the classroom.

To understand the human experience, one of the most important things is for children to learn to identify emotions – what they feel, why they feel that way and how to validate and regulate the emotions in themselves and those around them.

It’s a big job, and every person a child comes into contact with plays a role in it.

Dr. Elizabeth King teaches in the College of Education at Missouri State University and researches the language preschool teachers use that either validate or dismiss emotions.

She starts by explaining gendered language.

A teacher's job is complex. Not only does the teacher need to communicate subject matter clearly, he or she must do so in a manner that keeps attention. He must minimize distractions, answer questions as they arise, provoke students' critical thinking skills and perhaps most importantly, notice.

In our changing world, how can teachers be confident they are still teaching and reaching their students?

Dr. Stefanie Livers, assistant professor of childhood education and family studies at Missouri State University, researches teacher preparation and professional development of those already in the field. Her goal: to improve access and equity for all students.

Thumbs Up for Bear POWER

Jun 18, 2019

This past January, the first batch of eight Bear POWER students began their education at Missouri State University.

Bear POWER is a two-year, five-semester inclusive college program for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities.

Kim Roam, MSU faculty advisor for Bear POWER ambassadors, Natalie Olson, MSU Bear POWER ambassador and Susie Dains, MSU Bear POWER student, talk about the program and how it’s going so far.

From the very first moments, your child is learning. They are soaking in their environment and learning to interact with it.

Dr. Sascha Mowrey, assistant professor of early childhood education at Missouri State University, gives tips for preparing your child for a lifetime of learning.

To her, one of the most important characteristics that parents can instill in a child is curiosity. It can be challenging to always be “on” and engaged, but Mowrey says the best way to teach curiosity is to model it.

Reading and writing serve as the foundation for so much of elementary school education and always has. While that remains unchanged, expectations of children and teachers evolve with the times.

Dr. Chloe Bolyard, assistant professor of elementary education at Missouri State University, shares recent changes in elementary education.

One of the biggest challenges for all teachers, noted Bolyard, is to meet the diverse and unique needs of all the children in a classroom. 

Young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have a chance to experience college life thanks to a new program at Missouri State University called Bear POWER.

The first group of up to 10 students will begin their two-year, five-semester inclusive college education in January 2019.

Bear POWER Director Rachel Heinz offers more insights about the program.

Read the full transcript  

  Education is an area of concern for citizens in Missouri. More specifically, locally, early childhood education and poverty have remained red flag areas for years.  Dr. David Hough, dean of the College of Education at Missouri State University, talks about the intersection of poverty and education. He also brings to light current trends and ways that the system can be reformed to give more individualized attention to the students who many not have as much – or any – support at home.



Edit | Remove

  

The culture of poverty: It’s a reality for people everywhere in the world. Where it is often the most heart-wrenching is when it is seen in the face of a child.Dr. David Hough, dean of the College of Education at Missouri State University, talks about this topic.


From the beginning, Reesha Adamson could sense her calling. She wanted to improve the lives of young people – those of elementary school age, especially – who have behavioral disorders such as oppositional behaviors, depression, anxiety, and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) that manifest themselves in learning environments. Adamson, who is an assistant professor of special education at Missouri State University, explains her educational philosophy and why it's such an important issue for her.

Adamson, assistant professor of special education at Missouri State University, is working with local public schools to help a small section of students who struggle with following through on classroom engagement and aren’t learning at the same rate as their peers. Such students may have educational behavioral disorders, which differs from medical behavioral disorders. The question is whether the disorder affects performance in the classroom – not because the student isn’t capable of the workload, but because they can’t sustain until the class ends.