art and design

Having a stroke or a traumatic brain injury can make you feel like a foreigner in a strange land. Your cognition may still be fully intact, but sometimes you just can't speak the language.

After a stroke, most individuals need speech therapy, something that is offered free at Missouri State University's Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, and they often recoup much of their language. If you haven't recouped it all, you may become your own worse critic. This makes it difficult to engage in everyday social situations. You may feel embarrassed and become isolated.

Graphic novels. They're just a fancy name for long-form comics. But when you think about one, you may picture the bulging muscles of Marvel's superheroes. But my guests say not to judge comics by this preconceived imagery.

Cole Closser and Jennifer Murvin teach a course at Missouri State University on creating comics and are paving the road to an interdisciplinary program that is largely unheard of at the undergraduate level. Murvin and Closser share about what keeps them intrigued in this medium.

Each November, Native American Heritage Month is recognized with the goal of affirming and celebrating the identities of individuals who are often erased from history. Dr. Billie Follensbee, museum studies program coordinator in the art and design department at Missouri State University, has had a lifelong fascination with Native American history, art and archaeology.

All types of art can represent life and emotion. It is also often said that this art can help process feelings and express the deepest set of sentiments.

Missouri State University student Jennifer Rose Wolken exhibited a piece of work in May 2017 that showcased her talent in book binding and inspirational architectural vision. It also exposed her grief and helped her heal.

"The book that was exhibited at the art museum the first two weeks of May, it is a sculptural form that is based in book binding," said Wolken.

How well do you know Missouri’s small towns? Bruce West, photography professor in the art and design department at Missouri State, learned so much about Mississippi in his formulation of his book, “The True Gospel Preached Here,” that it inspired him to learn more about the place he now calls home.

This former East Coaster is trolling around small towns in Missouri to learn more about the state and the humanity of its inhabitants.

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