Sense of Community

Our ongoing, 10-part Community Journalism series airs quarterly

From poverty concerns to major policy decisions, this series dives beyond the headlines to provide in-depth coverage of issues facing people and organizations in the Ozarks. KSMU's team of reporters come together to produce 10 stories, four times a year;  see past espisodes of our Sense of Community series here.

Lee Ann Meador Norman

For KSMU’s Sense of Community Series, I’m Mike Smith.

We wind down our week long series of reports on historic preservation in the Ozarks, in West Plains Missouri where what’s become that city’s signature event took place June 19th and 20th.  The annual Old Time Music-Ozark Heritage Festival.  (SOUND: Voices singing I’ll Fly Away)

Todd Shanks is the Community Marketing Director for the City of West Plains, and a member of the 

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

For the KSMU Sense of Community series, I’m Mike Smith….

Just south of Branson, in Point Lookout Missouri where I talked to Kansas City resident Joan Scatt about her just completed visit to the Smithsonian of the Ozarks, The Ralph Foster Museum.   “It was highly educational, very informative, very well put together and I enjoyed it very much.  We’ve been in there 2 and a half hours and have to come back.  My favorites were the cameos and the stones, but I’m excited to see a (Rose O’Neill) Kewpie Doll for the first time, and I’m 68 years old”.  

Anna Skalicky

Eureka Springs has a long and fascinating history.  In this segment of KSMU's Sense of Community Series, KSMU's Michele Skalicky goes on a walking tour of an entire town that has been designated as an Historic Preservation District.

Ralph Wilson is working to keep the history of historic Eureka Springs, Arkansas alive by sharing stories about the city.  The Denver native, who came to the Northwest Arkansas in 2006, is one of two people who get paid to give tours of historic downtown.

Michele Skalicky / KSMU

Two local organizations are keeping alive the amazing accomplishments of a woman who helped pave the way for female artists.  In this segment of KSMU's Sense of Community Series, Michele Skalicky takes us to Bonniebrook and to the Rose O'Neill Museum.

Set along a flowing stream, complete with waterfalls in the middle of the Ozarks woods, it’s easy to see why Rose O’Neill loved Bonniebrook.

Nicholas Carter / KSMU

Built in 1929, the Lyric Theatre in downtown Harrison, Arkansas originally served as a venue for “talkies.”  Talkies came after silent pictures and were the first films to incorporate dialog, music and other forms of sound along with the film. Over the years the theatre has experienced several changes, but for many people it remains a vital part of the community’s history, culture and memories. 

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