Missouri State Journal

Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.

The Missouri State Journal is a weekly program keeping you in touch with Missouri State University.

As our world becomes more diverse, it’s important to make diversity and inclusion part of everyday culture.

To this end, Missouri State University hosts the annual Collaborative Diversity Conference on campus to promote the inclusion of diversity in our community.  

The Asian population in the United States comprises many culturally and geographically diverse ethnic subgroups. Their achievements and contributions to the country are many.   

Missouri State University will celebrate Asian Heritage Month throughout April to highlight the history, culture and traditions of Asians and Pacific Islanders. 

The world is constantly changing. Scientists and conservationists showcase events of climate change and global warming worldwide and are striving to slow down the effects.

Dr. Deb Finn, assistant professor of biology at Missouri State University, has spent her career studying flowing water environments, but she specifically loves the alpine streams, which are in high altitude environments above the permanent treeline. 

Having a stroke or a traumatic brain injury can make you feel like a foreigner in a strange land. Your cognition may still be fully intact, but sometimes you just can't speak the language.

After a stroke, most individuals need speech therapy, something that is offered free at Missouri State University's Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, and they often recoup much of their language. If you haven't recouped it all, you may become your own worse critic. This makes it difficult to engage in everyday social situations. You may feel embarrassed and become isolated.

Graphic novels. They're just a fancy name for long-form comics. But when you think about one, you may picture the bulging muscles of Marvel's superheroes. But my guests say not to judge comics by this preconceived imagery.

Cole Closser and Jennifer Murvin teach a course at Missouri State University on creating comics and are paving the road to an interdisciplinary program that is largely unheard of at the undergraduate level. Murvin and Closser share about what keeps them intrigued in this medium.

American society has come a long way since the inception of the feminist movement. Even as recently as the 1990s. Gender studies could be seen as quite radical. Now, those same notions are largely internalized for kids, thanks to pop culture references, social media, and positive role modeling.

Celebrating Dance

Feb 26, 2019

This March, dance will take center stage at Missouri State University. The university’s theatre and dance department will host the annual American College Dance Association Central Region Conference March 13-16.

This year’s theme is “Looking Back, Moving Forward” to honor the 100th anniversary of several dance artists and focus on the legacy and dance research that resulted from their work. 

Over the last several years, wine enthusiasts have cheered over the revelation that red wine has positive health benefits. While many assumed it was the grapes, skins and juice providing the antioxidants, the grape seeds took the back seat - until now.

Dr. Paul Durham, distinguished professor of biology at Missouri State University, and Jessica Cox, graduate student in Durham’s lab, share the good news about their recent National Institutes of Health funded study in grape seed extract.

Do students lose their religious beliefs when they enter college? Many believe yes. Dr. John Schmalzbauer, Blanche Gorma Strong Chair in Protestant Studies at Missouri State University, worked with historian Dr. Kathleen Mahoney to examine this question: Where does religion stand in the heart of American universities?

They compiled their research in a new book, "The Resilience of Religion in American Higher Education." It was published in September.

The sustainability movement continues to grow and evolve. Individuals are more concerned than ever about the source of their foods, materials and products they purchase. This focus has caused many industries to look closely at their processes, products and byproducts – ultimately to improve themselves and improve the reputation of the organization as a whole.

There’s an ancient saying that says “We’re standing on the shoulders of giants.” It means that each discovery or truth builds on previous discoveries.  

Dr. Matt Siebert, associate professor of chemistry at Missouri State University, talks about how his foundational research works toward the goal of ending disease. This is the first in a two-part series with Siebert.

Literature uniquely reflects society. Without trying to be a historical document, novels can reflect the author's worldview, values and beliefs - either overtly or in between the lines.

Dr. Erin Kappeler, assistant professor of English at Missouri State University, tells us about how we can use literature as a lens into the past, present and future.

We’ve all heard the phrase, “It’s in my genes.” Can your diet affect how your genes behave?

Yes, it can, according to a field of science known as nutrigenomics. 

Your health can be affected by so many things. Genetics, diet, stress, the people around you - just to name a few.

Dr. Kyler Sherman Wilkins, assistant professor of sociology at Missouri State University, is a social demographer who is interested in the distribution of health in Americans.

In November 2017, Missouri State University was awarded a grant from the office of violence against women in the department of justice. That project, which supports programming on MSU and OTC's campuses, is Project HEAL (Help, Educate, Advocate and Listen).

Kunti Bentley, project coordinator, shares about the program.

"What we're doing with the grant is to really focus on prevention and counseling and then victim advocacy," said Bentley. "What we want to do is move on from that heightened awareness of these issues and move into action."

Pages