Missouri State Journal

Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.

The Missouri State Journal is a weekly program keeping you in touch with Missouri State University.

As a butterfly enthusiast for his entire life, Dr. Chris Barnhart remembers collecting caterpillars in a grass-filled Radio Flyer wagon as a young child.

Now a distinguished professor of biology at Missouri State University, Barnhart says his hobby turned into an outreach program about a decade ago.

Hundreds of third through sixth grade students from the local area are taking a big field trip on Sept. 25. They'll be visiting the International Culture Fair, hosted by Missouri State University's modern and classical languages department.

"It's essentially a trip around the world," said Dr. Heidi Backes, coordinator of the event. "Students get a bag and a passport booklet. They visit 12 different booths, each representing a different country, and they do a particular activity related to the culture of each of those places."

Honoring and celebrating the history, culture and contributions of citizens of Latin heritage – that’s the goal of Latinx Heritage Month in September.

Missouri State University will host several events to engage and educate the campus and larger community about Latinx heritage. 

What species of ticks live in Missouri and in what quantities?

Dr. David Claborn, director of the Master of Public Health program at Missouri State University, is trying to answer these questions through his latest tick surveillance project. It’s made possible through a grant from the Missouri Department of Health and Senior Services.

Claborn highlights his research and shares some facts about ticks.

Below the surface and in the clear water, mussels abound. In Missouri alone, there are at least 60 species of mussels that are actively keeping our waterways clean.

Dr. Chris Barnhart, distinguished professor of biology at Missouri State University, is an international expert on freshwater mussels. He knows their ecological value as filter feeders and helps to replenish populations where they have been depleted.

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