Making a Difference

Every Other Month

Supported by the Community Foundation of the Ozarks, Making a Difference is a long-running series that draws upon the personal stories and voices of Ozarks residents to highlight key issues impacting our community. 

Currently the Springfield-Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavioral Health, CoxHealth, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center.  The purpose is to analyze the current state of mental health services available, assess the needs of the community, and address the gap between the two.

As part of this effort, the newest season of Making a Difference explores the topic of mental illness – with the objective of creating awareness and reducing stigma.  Let’s Talk About It: Normalizing Mental Health Conversations is a collection of intimate conversations with individuals navigating their own mental health journeys.

You can browse our Making a Difference archives below or at the CFO website.

recoveryinmotion.com

On this edition of Making a Difference; Normalizing Mental Health Conversations, we meet Kendall Swanson, a Springfield Glendale High School graduate, who at 16, was prescribed opiates after a trip to the dentist.  By age 18, she was addicted to the drugs.

Aaron Scott / Community Foundation of the Ozarks

You're listening to KSMU, and this is Making a Difference.

The Springfield Greene County Health Department, with funding support from the Missouri Foundation for Health, is leading a major mental health needs assessment in partnership with Burrell Behavorial Health, Cox Health, Mercy Springfield, and Jordan Valley Community Health Center. 

Mike Smith / KSMU-FM

Ginger Ramirez was going through tough times, a few years ago. The 33 year old and her children live in Northwest Springfield, Zone 1, which has the city’s highest rate of poverty: “Oh absolutely, there was no hope.  I felt like I was deteriorating, that I was falling apart, and my whole world was crashing. I wasn’t able to work anymore because of child care expenses.  I was living off donating plasma every week, making $70.00 a week.  That was my income to raise children and make a living.”

Community Foundation of the Ozarks

"In a rural community, the hospital takes on a bigger role, than it does, I think, in larger cities. The hospital is kind of all encompassing, and is there to provide whatever help you need."

Every Child Promise / Community Partnership of the Ozarks

The Every Child Promise:  Our Community Promises to Empower Families, So That Every Child, Age Birth-Six, Has the Opportunity to Enter Schools, Ready to Learn. 

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