All Things Considered

Monday-Thursday, 4-7 p.m.; Friday, 4-6:30 p.m.
  • Hosted by Melissa Block, Robert Siegel, Audie Cornish

In-depth reporting and transforming the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hear breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special - sometimes quirky - features. Below, view the latest news from ATC, or visit the program's website for a program rundown, among other content.

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A new novel set in late summer on Cape Cod is all about desire. Even the writing seems to drip with secrets and longing. Here's the author, Miranda Cowley Heller, reading from the first few pages.

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A note now - our next story deals with subject matter that is not appropriate for all listeners.

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A lot of us made it through the worst of COVID isolation by spending time with a guy named Ted Lasso.

(SOUNDBITE OF TV SHOW, "TED LASSO")

Say WeWork and one person comes to mind: Adam Neumann, the lanky founder and former CEO with flowing black hair and a rock-star persona who would carry on about the "energy" of the company's communal work spaces.

He also embraced a "party-boy life style," said Eliot Brown, whose new book with co-author Maureen Farrell, The Cult of We: WeWork and the Great Start-Up Delusion, was published on Tuesday.

Well before noon, Neumann was known to offer potential investors shots of tequila from a bottle he kept behind his desk.

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Soccer player Megan Rapinoe, swimmer Katie Ledecky and gymnast Simone Biles are among the 11,000 athletes competing in the Tokyo Olympics beginning this week on July 23.

More than 600 athletes from across the U.S. are headed to Japan to represent Team USA, and they'll have to navigate the twists and turns of this year's unusual Olympic Games.

In a first since President Biden took office, the Biden administration has transferred a detainee at the U.S. military prison in Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, to Morocco, signaling a renewed effort to shrink the highly controversial prison's population — and possibly close it entirely.

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After a dizzying rally this year, stock markets were hit hard on Monday as a spike in coronavirus infections around the world reinforced the reality of living with a pandemic that refuses to go away.

The Dow Jones Industrial Average tumbled 725 points, or 2.1%, and had its worst day since October, while the S&P 500 fell 1.6%.

The losses mark a rare day of declines for a market that was at record highs as early as last week.

Here are three key things to know about the market's fall.

Back in May, a group of scientists — many at the top of the virology field — shifted the debate about the origins of COVID-19. They published a letter in the journal Science saying the lab-leak theory needs to be taken more seriously by the scientific community.

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