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Politics

Salary Commission Won't Meet in Springfield

http://ozarkspub.vo.llnwd.net/o37/KSMU/audio/mp3/salarycomm_817.mp3

The commission that decides if elected officials should get a pay raise met today (November 20) in Jefferson City and doesn't plan to meet in Southwest Missouri before releasing its recommendations. KSMU's Missy Shelton reports.

The commission that decides if elected officials should get a pay raise met today (Monday) in Jefferson City and doesn't plan to meet in Southwest Missouri before releasing its recommendations.

Earlier this month, voters approved a constitutional change that makes it more difficult for lawmakers to reject the recommendations of the Citizens' Commission on Compensation for Elected Officials.

The panel must issue its recommendation by December first.

But before that happens, the commission will collect public input on salaries for elected officials.

Jack Pohrer is chairman of the commission.

He and five other commissioners participated in the hearing at the state capitol.

He says there will be three more meetings as the constitution requires.

Statewide elected officials, state lawmakers and elected judges haven't had a pay raise since 2000.

At today's (Monday's) hearing, Pohrer says there were several witness who testified, including the Chief Justice of the Missouri Supreme Court.

Pohrer says the state is enjoying good economic times.

He says the commission told the state representative a pay increase seems appropriate.

Under the constitutional amendment voters approved, the commission's recommendations will take effect unless two-thirds of lawmakers reject them before February first.