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Politics

Legislation to Reduce the Medicaid Roles Appears Dead

http://ozarkspub.vo.llnwd.net/o37/KSMU/audio/mp3/legislatio_1539.mp3

Legislation designed to reduce the number of people on Medicaid is close to dead. KSMU's Missy Shelton reports.

Senate Democratic Floor Leader Ken Jacob told Republican Senator John Loudon he doesn't want the bill to come to a vote.

Earlier this year, the House approved a version of the bill that would've saved money by making fewer people eligible for Medicaid...The Senate gutted the bill.

Supporters of the senate's version had hoped to save money by requiring an annual review to determine if any ineligible people are on Medicaid and getting those people out of the program.

Though no bill is actually dead until the clock strikes 5 P-M on May 14th, supporters say the proposal is in serious trouble.

Date: 05/04/04 Lawmakers Remember One Year Anniversary of Deadly Tornadoes

Not long after a tornado tore through Lawrence County on May 4th, 2003, Darla Sanders says she and her father met others at Elm Branch Christian Church between Aurora and Marionville to help the storm victims.

Darla Sanders came to the capitol on the one year anniversary of the storm, along with other members of her church.

The House honored the Elm Branch congregation with an Outstanding Missourian Award.

The congregations of Liberty United Methodist Church and St Mary's Catholic Church also received the award.

Representative Jack Goodman's district arguably was hit hardest by the storm.

He says these churches deserve recognition for all they did.

Goodman says churches and other organizations in the community responded with so much assistance, outside groups took notice.

Goodman says he was delighted that the House recognized the three churches for their kindness and generosity.

Goodman says while there's been tremendous progress over the last year, there's still much to be done.

As folks in southwest Missouri reflect on what happened one year ago, Darla Sanders says it's important to remember that some good did come from the tragedy.