Nicki Donnelson

Co-host of "Missouri State Journal"

Nicki received a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Business Administration from Missouri State in marketing, in 2002 and 2004 respectively. After gaining experience in writing, marketing, special event planning, fundraising and public relations, she returned to the university to work as the public relations specialist in the office of university communications. There she tells the university’s story by sharing the stories of individuals at Missouri State. 

Ways to Connect

Over the last several years, wine enthusiasts have cheered over the revelation that red wine has positive health benefits. While many assumed it was the grapes, skins and juice providing the antioxidants, the grape seeds took the back seat - until now.

Dr. Paul Durham, distinguished professor of biology at Missouri State University, and Jessica Cox, graduate student in Durham’s lab, share the good news about their recent National Institutes of Health funded study in grape seed extract.

Do students lose their religious beliefs when they enter college? Many believe yes. Dr. John Schmalzbauer, Blanche Gorma Strong Chair in Protestant Studies at Missouri State University, worked with historian Dr. Kathleen Mahoney to examine this question: Where does religion stand in the heart of American universities?

They compiled their research in a new book, "The Resilience of Religion in American Higher Education." It was published in September.

The sustainability movement continues to grow and evolve. Individuals are more concerned than ever about the source of their foods, materials and products they purchase. This focus has caused many industries to look closely at their processes, products and byproducts – ultimately to improve themselves and improve the reputation of the organization as a whole.

There’s an ancient saying that says “We’re standing on the shoulders of giants.” It means that each discovery or truth builds on previous discoveries.  

Dr. Matt Siebert, associate professor of chemistry at Missouri State University, talks about how his foundational research works toward the goal of ending disease. This is the first in a two-part series with Siebert.

Literature uniquely reflects society. Without trying to be a historical document, novels can reflect the author's worldview, values and beliefs - either overtly or in between the lines.

Dr. Erin Kappeler, assistant professor of English at Missouri State University, tells us about how we can use literature as a lens into the past, present and future.

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