Nicki Donnelson

Co-host of "Missouri State Journal"

Nicki received a Bachelor of Science and a Master of Business Administration from Missouri State in marketing, in 2002 and 2004 respectively. After gaining experience in writing, marketing, special event planning, fundraising and public relations, she returned to the university to work as the public relations specialist in the office of university communications. There she tells the university’s story by sharing the stories of individuals at Missouri State. 

Ways to Connect

An egg brings forth a caterpillar, the caterpillar changes into a chrysalis, and from a chrysalis comes a butterfly. It’s truly an amazing sight. These changes in a butterfly reveal so much about the life cycle and are fascinating for the young and old. Dr. Chris Barnhart, professor of biology at Missouri State University, discusses native butterflies and the Dr. Bill Roston Native Butterfly House in The Springfield-Greene County Botanical Center and Nathanael Greene/Close Memorial Park.

The mission of the Green Leadership Academy for Diverse Ecosystems (GLADE) is to care for Ozarks ecosystems, to develop youth into community conservation leaders, and to improve the quality of life through conservation and education throughout the Ozarks. Two Missouri State University students who will serve as counselors at GLADE for the second time speak about their experience working with these high school juniors and seniors. They are joined by Dr. Janice Greene, biology professor and director of the Bull Shoals Field Station.

Slavery has existed in one form or another through much of recorded history. In the United States, the Emancipation Proclamation was issued in 1863, but many slaves' servitude didn't end until the Civil War ended in 1865, or even later in some cases. On June 19, 1865, the first African American Emancipation Day was observed, now called Juneteenth.

Francine Pratt, assistant to the vice president of the division for diversity and inclusion at Missouri State University, discusses Juneteenth, the significance and the local commemoration.

The public affairs mission of Missouri State University guides so much of what we do, and one of the ways this is displayed is in the leadership development of the students on campus. Dr. Marissa Leclaire Weaver from the Center for Leadership and Volunteerism discusses what they do and how this translates to helping the community.

Throughout history and especially in religious texts, the concept of the "heavenly book" has recurred. Dr. Leslie Baynes, associate professor of religious studies at Missouri State University, researched this theme and published "The Heavenly Book Motif in Judeo-Christian Apocalypses, 200 BCE-200 CE."

Spring is the perfect season for outdoor activity, and studies show many physical and mental health benefits for taking walks and exploring nature. Dr. Janice Greene, professor of biology at Missouri State University and director of the Bull Shoals Field Station, gives tips for preserving nature.

Ask anyone who lives in the Ozarks and they'll tell you about the strange weather changes that happen. Tornadoes are a part of the area's history, and Dr. Brooks Blevins, professor of Ozarks History at Missouri State University, found a letter documenting one farmer's experience during the 1880 Marshfield cyclone.

Eva Mozes Kor was 10 years old when she and her twin sister, Miriam, arrived in Auschwitz and became part of Dr. Josef Mengele’s infamous twin experiments. Kor will present her life story and journey to forgiveness during a free public lecture at 7 p.m. at Missouri State University on Feb. 26.

For more information on Kor, visit www.candlesholocaustmuseum.org. For more information on this event, call (417) 836-5514 or email religiousstudies@missouristate.edu. 

Eva Mozes Kor was 10 years old when she and her twin sister, Miriam, arrived in Auschwitz and became part of Dr. Josef Mengele’s infamous twin experiments. Kor will present her life story and journey to forgiveness during a free public lecture at 7 p.m. at Missouri State University on Feb. 26.

For more information on Kor, visit www.candlesholocaustmuseum.org. For more information on this event, call (417) 836-5514 or email religiousstudies@missouristate.edu. 

"The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks" has been on the New York Times bestseller list since February 2010, stirring controversy and raising questions about ethics. Dr. Paul Durham, professor of biology and director for the Center for Biomedical and Life Sciences at Missouri State University in the Jordan Valley Innovation Center, discusses Lacks' contribution and the continuation of biomedical ethical questions.

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