Emily Yeap

Host, Missouri State Journal

A native of Malaysia, Emily moved to Springfield in 2010 and started working at Missouri State University in 2014. She’s currently the public relations specialist in the office of university communications. She has a BA in Mass Communications from Colorado State University-Pueblo and a Master of Journalism from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

Young adults with intellectual and developmental disabilities will have a chance to experience college life thanks to a new program at Missouri State University called Bear POWER.

The first group of up to 10 students will begin their two-year, five-semester inclusive college education in January 2019.

Bear POWER Director Rachel Heinz offers more insights about the program.

Read the full transcript  

For many families, summer means taking vacations to relax, soak in the sun and spend quality time with loved ones.

Whether you take a short road trip or venture overseas to explore, the goal is to enjoy a fun, stress-free holiday. 

Dr. Stephanie Hein, department head of hospitality leadership at Missouri State University, offers some tips and advice on maximizing your summer vacation.

Summer is around the corner, and for many people, getting into summer-ready shape is a priority.

While maintaining weight and fitness level all-year-round is the best practice, things get in the way and it can be tough.

There are no quick fixes, but do not give up. There is still time to get fit for the summer if you put in the effort. 

In the Midtown neighborhood of Springfield, the Ujima literacy program is helping to improve children’s literacy.

Ujima, a Swahili word that means collective work and responsibility, is an effort made possible by several organizations. They include Missouri State University, Springfield Public Schools, Springfield NAACP, Springfield-Greene County Library, Parents as Teachers and the Bartley-Decatur Neighborhood Center.

Students walking on the Missouri State University campus.
MSU

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), more than 75 percent of all mental health conditions begin before age 24. That’s one reason why college is such a risky time for students’ mental health.

To shine a light on this issue, Missouri State University will host its first ever Impact Summit: College Student Mental Health Conference on campus this spring. It will take place from 7:50 a.m.-4:50 p.m. May 2 in the Plaster Student Union. 

The topic of racism will take center stage at Missouri State University’s Collaborative Diversity Conference this year.

Themed “Facing Racism in 2018 and Beyond: A Changing Dynamic,” the conference will take place from April 25-27 in the Plaster Student Union on campus. Wes Pratt, chief diversity officer and assistant to the president at MSU, offers more information about the event. 

Sustainability – that’s the focus of Missouri State University’s spring 2018 Public Affairs Conference.

Free and open to the public, the conference will take place April 10-12 on campus. Presenters will share their views on the theme of “Sustainability in Practice: Consensus and Consequences.” 

Obtaining healthy food is a challenge for many families, especially those living in low-income areas.

In Springfield, a collaborative farm-to-table project is on a mission to improve access to fresh, local food for residents in the city’s Zone 1 neighborhoods.

It’s a fact: every year, heart disease causes one in four deaths in the United States, making it the country’s leading killer.

But the good news is that heart disease can be prevented by making healthy lifestyle choices. February is American Heart Month and it’s a perfect time to focus on our hearts and see what steps we can take to live healthier. 

Ben Hunt, employee wellness coordinator at Missouri State University, shares the importance of wellness and exercise in protecting heart health.

On Feb. 16, 2018, Asian communities worldwide will welcome the Year of the Dog.

Based on the lunar calendar, the Lunar New Year celebration, also known as Chinese New Year or Spring Festival, falls on a different date each year, normally between Jan. 21 and Feb. 20. Lasting for 15 days, it’s a time to gather with family and wish each other happiness and prosperity.

In Springfield, Missouri State University will host a lineup of events on campus Feb. 17-24 to mark the holiday. 

Throughout history, the culture and contributions of African Americans have, too often, been neglected or overlooked. That’s why Black History Month, which takes place in the United States each year in February, is an important observance.

Helping to save someone’s life is as easy as donating blood.

You will have the opportunity to do this Jan. 23-25, 2018, when Missouri State University hosts a blood drive on campus in honor of National Blood Donor Month.

The event is jointly organized by Missouri State’s Gamma Sigma Sigma and Community Blood Center of the Ozarks.

Sociologist, Dr. Alicia Walker likes to explore behaviors that deviate from cultural norms such as infidelity.

After reading several articles that challenged common sense understanding about infidelity, especially among women, Walker set out to research the topic of women and affairs for her doctoral dissertation.

The project took several years and involved in-depth interviews with women across the country who sought or participated in affairs through a dating site.

During the holiday season, it’s easy to get carried away with celebrating and spending.

But with 2017 coming to a close in a couple of weeks, this is the time to perform a financial health checkup. Knowing where you stand on your finances before year-end is a smart move to make.

The countdown to Christmas is well underway.

As we shop for presents, decorate our homes and plan gatherings with loved ones, another thing on our to-do list should include how we can give back to our community during the holiday season. 

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