Emily Yeap

Host, Missouri State Journal

A native of Malaysia, Emily moved to Springfield in 2010 and started working at Missouri State University in 2014. She’s currently the public relations specialist in the office of university communications. She has a BA in Mass Communications from Colorado State University-Pueblo and a Master of Journalism from Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada.

We all hope to enjoy holiday gatherings filled with good food, company and conversations. However, that’s not always possible because conflicts with loved ones can arise. 

Two individuals from Missouri State University’s Center for Dispute Resolution (CDR),  Director Dr. Charlene Berquist and Associate Director Heather Blades, address holiday conflict.

We’ve all heard the phrase, “It’s in my genes.” Can your diet affect how your genes behave?

Yes, it can, according to a field of science known as nutrigenomics. 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than 64,000 Americans died from drug overdoses in 2016. Opioids now cause about three-fourths of all overdose deaths.

One solution to address this deadly crisis is reducing dependence on prescription painkillers through Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS). 

Bob Linder, Missouri State University

Whether it’s the hillbilly stereotype or the backwoods myth, it’s a fact that there’s plenty of misunderstandings about the Ozarks and Ozarkers.

Spreading across roughly 40,000-45,000 square miles, the Ozarks covers much of the southern half of Missouri and a large part of northern Arkansas. It also extends into northeast Oklahoma and southeast Kansas.

There are many stereotypes about the Ozarks and Ozarkers. They range from frontiersmen to hillbillies to moonshiners and banjo players.

With his research on Ozarks history, Dr. Brooks Blevins tries to dispel those misconceptions and present the most complete portrait of the region. 

Pages