Missouri State Journal

Women all over the world experience it and recent statistics show that 6,000 women per day reach menopause. With the onset occurring on average between age 45 and 55, women may spend as much as one third of their lives in this state according to Dr. Barbara Bushman, professor of kinesiology at Missouri State University. She says that many don't maintain activity levels and make healthy choices as they age, which can worsen some of the side effects of menopause. 

I'm Nicki Donnelson and Bushman is my guest today on the Missouri State Journal. 

How does an introvert land on stage with a successful career in the spotlight?

Lisa Brescia, assistant professor of theatre and dance at Missouri State University, says it is possible.

 

Her expertise is in musical theatre acting, Brescia says, including smoothing the moments between script and lyrics and finding appropriate movements to act out the songs. However, that is not what she is teaching currently.

After the sirens are turned off and the emergencies are diffused, the police officer’s work is not done. Reporting the event in detail is next, but what should it include?

Dr. Leslie Seawright, assistant professor of English at Missouri State University., is interested in the creation of police reports.

Seawright’s husband was a police officer while she was pursuing her degree and she found the report writing process fascinating. 

Everyone can do their part to make their communities safer – that’s the core of Green Dot, a bystander intervention program founded by Dr. Dorothy Edwards in 2007.

Green Dot relies on the power of cultural and peer influence to reduce or stop power-based personal violence, such as sexual assault, dating violence and stalking.

Hundreds of schools and universities across the country have adopted the Green Dot strategy. Missouri State University launched the program on campus in August 2016. 

Most everyone agrees parenting is a tough job. That’s why several agencies in Greene County led by the Community Partnership of the Ozarks (CPO) have joined forces to implement the Positive Parenting Program, also known as Triple P.

The program is made possible thanks to a $700,000 grant secured by CPO from the Missouri Foundation for Health.

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