Mercy Springfield

CoxHealth

A new partnership in Springfield will train students for careers as emergency medical technicians or paramedics.

The Emergency Medical Services (EMS) program at Ozarks Technical Community College was dedicated Thursday.  The program, co-sponsored by CoxHealth and Mercy, not only trains students for careers as EMT’s and paramedics, it also provides continuing education for those who already work in the field.

Joe Loong / Flickr

The training this weekend  is part of the national campaign, Stop the Bleed, which gained momentum after the Sandy Hook Elementary School shooting in Connecticut in 2012, according to Mercy Hospital Springfield.

"A bunch of the leaders in the nation got together and thought, 'how can we stop people from dying from preventable deaths with just some basic hemorrhage techniques for that life threatening bleeding situation?'" said Keith Schaefer, director of Trauma Services at Mercy Hospital Springfield.

Mercy Springfield
Chloe O'Neil / KSMU

Mercy Springfield says the interim president of its regional hospital system will remain in the role for the foreseeable future.

According to a news release, the organization said it informed staff Wednesday that Jon Swope will continue as interim president of Mercy Springfield Communities and Dr. Alan Scarrow will return to practicing medicine full-time as a neurosurgeon. Scarrow had served as president for three years.

Updated Nov. 27 with federal decision — Following an investigation and subsequent layoffs, Mercy Hospital Springfield is no longer at risk of losing federal funding due to reports of patient abuse. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services gave notice this month that the southwest Missouri hospital has achieved compliance with patient care standards after implementing a corrective plan.

Summer Survival Tips to Avoid Heat Related Illness

Jun 19, 2017
KSMU archives

Heat related illness led to 25 deaths last year in Missouri, according to the state’s department of health. Officials are advising how to stay safe during Summer Weather Safety Week.

Stella Falconer, the quality nurse specialist for Mercy Springfield’s emergency room, says, “Typically we see between 40-50 people each summer, primarily heat exhaustion or milder symptoms. We do on occasion get heat stroke, the more severe, life threatening.”

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