Eric Greitens

Right to Work
Scott Harvey / KSMU

The debate over the economic impact of Missouri’s right-to-work law did not end when Gov. Eric Greitens’ signed Senate Bill 19 on Monday, which prohibits unions and employers from requiring workers to pay dues.

Hours after the bill signing, labor interests filed a referendum petition that would delay the implementation of the law until voters can weigh in on the matter.

Eric Greitens
Scott Harvey / KSMU

Using an abandoned warehouse in Springfield as his backdrop, Republican Gov. Eric Greitens signed legislation Monday making Missouri the nation’s 28th right-to-work state.

The law, which bars employers and unions from requiring workers to pay union dues or fees, completes decades of work by the GOP and business groups. Lawmakers passed a right-to-work bill in 2015 but it was vetoed by then Democratic Gov. Jay Nixon.  

Scott Harvey / KSMU

Missouri Gov. Eric Greitens’ proposed budget invests more in K-12 education while slashing hundreds of million in other areas.

The first budget for the newly sworn-in Republican governor was unveiled before a crowd at the Early Childhood Center in Nixa, where he pledged $5.95 billion in revenue for elementary and secondary education.

“There will be more money through gaming funds, federal funds and state funds into K-12 education. It’s a total increase of 4.1 percent,” said Greitens.  

Carrington Hall
Scott Harvey / KSMU

Missouri State University has a $6.3 million hole to fill as part of $146 million that Gov. Eric Greitens is withholding from the budget due to a projected state revenue shortfall.

On Tuesday, a day after Greitens’ announcement, MSU President Clif Smart told reporters the spending restrictions account for 7.2 percent of the school’s state appropriations for the current fiscal year.  

Smart says Missouri State will use one-time money from reserves to make up the loss, but any ongoing withholdings will likely mean tuition hikes and could affect personnel.

Scott Harvey / KSMU

A local law enforcement official was honored during inauguration proceedings Monday for applying a tourniquet to woman after her leg was severed in a car accident.  

Sgt. Trevor Teeling of the Greene County Sheriff’s Department was among roughly 150 Missourians recognized during the Honor our Heroes event that took place prior to Eric Greitens being sworn in as governor. The ceremony was held in lieu of the traditional inaugural parade.

Teeling said he was just doing his job.

Pages