Missouri State Journal

Tuesday, 9:30 a.m.

The Missouri State Journal is a weekly program keeping you in touch with Missouri State University.

Not being able to communicate effectively or understand people can be so discouraging and frustrating. It leaves you out – in the dark. Lauren Jones, director of the Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic at Missouri State University, says parents usually become concerned around age 2 that their toddler isn’t talking as much as other children they know. Jones says that signs can be evident before that as well. The clarity or intelligibility of speech for a young child is another common concern, she noted. 

Missouri State is focused on developing educated citizens of the world – citizens who are engaged in the community, ready to lead with integrity and who are concerned with global issues and respect diverse perspectives. In order to get the campus invested in this mission, we host an annual Public Affairs Conference.

Over the past few decades, the global marketplace has evolved. More international business transactions take place. Team members may be spread throughout the globe. And with that, many companies now seek  individuals who can demonstrate cultural competencies - like language skills - when hiring for positions.

Dr. Jason Jolley, head of the modern and classical languages (MCL) department at Missouri State University, shares about the evolution of language education.

From the very first moments, your child is learning. They are soaking in their environment and learning to interact with it.

Dr. Sascha Mowrey, assistant professor of early childhood education at Missouri State University, gives tips for preparing your child for a lifetime of learning.

To her, one of the most important characteristics that parents can instill in a child is curiosity. It can be challenging to always be “on” and engaged, but Mowrey says the best way to teach curiosity is to model it.

The Missouri State University Vision Screening Program provides free vision screenings to the community. Since 2013, it has screened more than 35,000 children and adults across southwest Missouri.

This August, just in time for National Children’s Vision and Learning Month, the program will expand its impact into central Missouri – starting with Lebanon. 

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