Here and Now

Monday-Thursday, 1-3 p.m.
  • Hosted by Robin Young, Jeremy Hobson

Stay up-to-date with the news between Morning Edition and All Things Considered.  Here & Now combines the best in news journalism with intelligent, broad-ranging conversation to form a fast-paced program that updates the news from the morning and adds important conversations on public policy and foreign affairs, science and technology, and the arts: film, theater, music, food, and more.

At the Pentagon Thursday, Vice President Mike Pence lays out the Trump administration’s plan to create the first new branch of the U.S. military in more than 70 years: a “space force.”

Here & Now’s Robin Young checks in with space journalist and Alabama Public Radio news director Pat Duggins (@PatDuggins).

A federal judge in Seattle has blocked a Texas group from publishing blueprints for 3D-printed guns. The ruling, which came down Tuesday night, was in response to a lawsuit from eight states and the District of Columbia. Their suit called the release of the gun blueprints “a bell that cannot be un-rung.”

No matter where you live in North America, someone has lived there before you. Now, there’s an app to tell you who.

The app, called Native Land, started with one goal: help right the wrongs of injustice experienced by indigenous people of North America. The Northwest News Network’s Emily Schwing (@EmilySchwing) has more.

Facebook announced that it has identified a coordinated and inauthentic political influence campaign ahead of the November midterm elections. The company said it removed at least 32 accounts and pages after an initial investigation.

Here & Now‘s Jeremy Hobson speaks with Kurt Wagner (@KurtWagner8), senior editor of social media at Recode, about the announcement.

The Senate on Tuesday voted to renew the National Flood Insurance Program hours before it was set to expire during the height of hurricane season. The House passed a temporary extension for the program last week, authorizing it only through November, and the Senate followed suit Tuesday. Critics of the National Flood Insurance Program say it needs structural changes, not short-term extensions.

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