Lisa Rodriguez

Lisa Rodriguez is an Community Engagement intern.

Lisa graduated from Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas in 2010 with a degree in Convergent Journalism, with emphasis in television broadcast, and a minor in Spanish.

Lisa's favorite thing to do in Kansas City is see live entertainment, be it a sporting event, dance performance, play, or concert. She also enjoys reading, experimenting in the kitchen, and going out to eat.

Lisa currently works as a server, bartender and singer at Le Fou Frog, a French bistro near the River Market.

She was born in Santiago, Chile, and mostly grew up in Kansas City.

Missouri now has until August 2019 to fall in line with federal ID requirements, as the Department of Homeland Security on Monday extended the deadline.

The so-called Real ID law is meant to prevent terrorist attacks and fraud by heightening security standards.

Missouri is among 16 states that have not yet fully complied and if it doesn’t update IDs, residents eventually will have to present a passport to board a domestic flight.

The extension means residents can still fly using their current Missouri driver’s license.

At more than 60 years old, Kansas City’s Buck O’Neil bridge is nearing the end of its useful life. And it’s one of thousands across Missouri that the state Department of Transportation can’t afford to replace.

In 2017, MoDOT gave the city two options: It could make major repairs, which would mean closing the bridge for two years. Or the city could make smaller repairs but keep it open to limited traffic.

Updated Sept. 14, 2018, with court ruling — The wide-ranging initiative petition that would change how Missouri draws its legislative districts and effectively ban lobbyist gifts won't be on the Nov. 6 ballot, a judge ruled Friday.

Missouri Gov. Mike Parson arrived in Kansas City on Thursday for what he said was a commitment to working with the state's two biggest cities. He was joined by Democrats Kansas City Mayor Sly James and St. Louis Mayor Lyda Krewson on a multistop tour of the city.

Updated, 4:40 p.m. Thursday: The Missouri Department of Revenue has turned a stack of documents over to the State Auditor's Office, according to a news release.

Auditor Nicole Galloway took the unusual step of issuing a subpoena Wednesday after the Department of Revenue failed to comply with an earlier request.

Galloway initiated the audit six weeks ago to ensure Missourians owed tax refunds were being paid on time. State law requires returns not paid within 45 days be paid with interest, which Galloway says isn't good stewardship of taxpayer dollars.