Jennifer Moore

News Director & Content Coordinator

As News Director, Jennifer oversees news gathering and production for KSMU-Ozarks Public Radio; in her role as Content Coordinator, she makes sure all programs on KSMU, including those produced locally, nationally, and internationally, flow seamlessly over the air.  She trains the student reporters and announcers and hosts the monthly program Engaging the Community.

Jennifer hails from West Plains, Missouri, and graduated from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. Her Master's Degree from Missouri State University blended Middle Eastern politics and journalism. She lived in the Persian Gulf for five years and studied at the American University in Cairo. She has received the Excellence in Legal Journalism Award from The Missouri Bar, a national Edward R. Murrow Award for coverage of the Joplin tornado, and the 2013 Honorable Mention for the Toner Prize for Excellence in Political Reporting.

She's the author of "Covering Elections for Smaller Newsrooms: A Template," and is always eager to hear story ideas or feedback from community members and listeners.

Ways to Connect

Missouri State Parks

There's a place in the Ozarks where wild horses still roam and where the most adventurous of hikers can wander the wilderness for days.

For those listeners looking for a fall adventure, I took a day trip with my daughter to Missouri’s newest developed state park, Echo Bluff State Park, and brought along a recorder so we could create an audio postcard.

We begin by loading up the bikes since Echo Bluff has plenty of trails.

Ryan Welch / KSMU

All this week, we’re investigating civility and what role it plays in our community.

Today, we’re considering the news media:  what role do – or should – journalists play in encouraging civil discourse?  And what’s the state of civility in terms of how journalists themselves are treated?

Let’s tackle that one first by taking a step back and looking through a nationwide lens.

Christ Episcopal Church

On the corner of Kimbrough and Walnut in downtown Springfield sits one of the city’s oldest churches:  Christ Episcopal Church.  Inside, the Reverend Kenneth L. Chumbley, or “Father Ken” as he’s known, is delivering a sermon to his flock.

Father Ken has been here for nearly 22 years, and he says he’d rate the state of civility among Christian groups here in Springfield as “good.”

“It’s healthy. In my experience here, I can think of no occasion when Christians have been uncivil to one another. I think generally, we treat one another very respectfully. I think we generally treat one another as children of God,” Chumbley said.

Sarah Teague/Claire Kidwell
KSMU

A total of  305 law enforcement officers were on duty during President Donald Trump’s visit to Springfield Wednesday – that includes officers from the Springfield Police Department, Greene County, and the Missouri State Highway Patrol, according to SPD spokeswoman Lisa Cox.

Officers kept a close eye on the protesters and anti-protesters who came out of the woodwork to exercise their First Amendment rights to the freedom of speech and of assembly.

Flickr / File Photo

Suicide rates are higher in rural areas than urban areas—and the gap between urban and rural suicide rates is widening, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.  

A small clinic sits on the main drag in Mansfield, Missouri – that’s in Wright County, one of Missouri’s 70 counties without a full-time psychiatrist, according to the Missouri Board of Healing Arts.

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